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Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: January ::
Re: Accents English
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0076  Tuesday, 15 January 2002

[1]     From:   Thomas Larque <
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        Date:   Monday, 14 Jan 2002 16:18:56 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0056 Accents English

[2]     From:   Graham Hall <
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        Date:   Monday, 14 Jan 2002 22:12:11 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0056 Small talk

[3]     From:   Stuart Manger <
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        Date:   Monday, 14 Jan 2002 23:23:53 +0000
        Subj:   SHK 13.0056 Accents English

[4]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Monday, 14 Jan 2002 18:31:23 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0056 Accents English


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thomas Larque <
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Date:           Monday, 14 Jan 2002 16:18:56 -0000
Subject: 13.0056 Accents English
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0056 Accents English

>My great ambition is to stage a Shakespeare play
> using northern English accents.  I think it would be very powerful,
>rich and far more authentic than the RP drone.
>
> SAM SMALL

You have been beaten to the punch, particularly by Barry Rutter's
"Northern Broadsides" company, which started with a critically acclaimed
"Richard III" and then went on to a variety of other Shakespeare plays
and other drama.  I have seen their "Midsummer Night's Dream", "Antony
and Cleopatra" and "Romeo and Juliet" all of which were beautifully and
inventively directed, and sounded wonderful in a variety of Northern
English accents (Rutter insists on authentic accents from born and bred
local speakers).  I think Rutter's main motive in setting up the company
was to allow himself to play the juicy Shakespearean roles that he was
otherwise denied, in his own voice (rather than having to put on RP),
but this perhaps slightly selfish original motive has produced much
wonderful theatre.  I encourage anybody who has the chance
to see them.

Thomas Larque.

"Shakespeare and His Critics"
http://shakespearean.org.uk

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Graham Hall
 <
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Date:           Monday, 14 Jan 2002 22:12:11 +0000
Subject: 13.0056 Small talk
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0056 Small talk

Reith didn't "invent" RP. Daniel Jones was describing it in the 1890s.

Films made during WW2 are not necessarily similar to films portraying
WW2. The majority of the latter are post war.

"Authentic" accents can to be "normal". The accent-spread in Dad's Army
is possible but not probable for the setting but speech must be
considered normal. The Scots/Welsh accents are not authentic. They are
manipulated for comic effect.

There is no proposition to always produce Shakespeare in BBCP inspired
RP.

(RP inspired BBCP in any case)

Shakespeare in any accent must be considered as worth the attempt 

 

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