Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: January ::
Re: Distinctions
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0186  Friday, 25 January 2002

[1]     From:   Don Bloom <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 24 Jan 2002 13:18:15 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0169 Re: Distinctions

[2]     From:   Steve Roth <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 24 Jan 2002 16:38:28 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0169 Re: Distinctions


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Don Bloom <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 24 Jan 2002 13:18:15 -0600
Subject: 13.0169 Re: Distinctions
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0169 Re: Distinctions

Gabriel Egan writes,

> No-one in Shakespeare's company would have dreamt of casting a women
> actor in a female role, either.

Does Gabriel have a source for this? Or is he just stating more
positively than I would what is often taken for granted?

For example, women were appearing in the commedia dell' arte productions
weren't they? (And had been for some time.) They appeared in Moliere's
plays in France just a few decades after Shakespeare's day. They had
parts in courts masques. I don't want to be persnickety, but can we thus
assume that nobody in England even thought of using women on stage?
(Leaving aside the fantasy elements of *Shakespeare in Love*.)

I fear I'm a little hazy on my early modern theatre history and will
have to drag home some books on this and re-educate myself. Do those
with more (and more current) knowledge of this area have some
suggestions?

Cheers,
don

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steve Roth <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 24 Jan 2002 16:38:28 -0800
Subject: 13.0169 Re: Distinctions
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0169 Re: Distinctions

     Charles Weinstein writes,

     > No one in Shakespeare's company would have dreamed of
     > casting Will Kempe or Robert Armin as Hamlet, Lear, Othello
     > or Macbeth; but ours is an age that confounds vital distinctions,
     > including those between low comedy and high tragedy, the
     > bourgeois and the royal, character actors and heroic agonists.

I think perhaps Charles either agrees with, or never read, Sidney:

"...all their Playes bee neither right Tragedies, nor right Comedies,
mingling Kinges and Clownes, not because the matter so carrieth it, but
thrust in the Clowne by head and shoulders to play a part in majesticall
matters, with neither decencie nor discretion: so as neither the
admiration and Commiseration, nor the the right sportfulnesse is by
their mongrell Tragicomedie obtained."

Steve
http://princehamlet.com

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.