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Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: January ::
Re: SHAXICON Meets SHAXICAN
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0233  Tuesday, 29 January 2002

[1]     From:   Andy White <
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        Date:   Sunday, 27 Jan 2002 13:39:33 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0193 Re: SHAXICON Meets SHAXICAN

[2]     From:   Imtiaz Habib <
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        Date:   Monday, 28 Jan 2002 18:39:03 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0227 Re: SHAXICON Meets SHAXICAN

[3]     From:   Steve Roth <
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        Date:   Monday, 28 Jan 2002 18:23:48 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0227 Re: SHAXICON Meets SHAXICAN


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andy White <
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Date:           Sunday, 27 Jan 2002 13:39:33 -0500
Subject: 13.0193 Re: SHAXICON Meets SHAXICAN
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0193 Re: SHAXICON Meets SHAXICAN

Apologies in advance if I missed something earlier on this thread: is
there any work encoding Shakespeare's texts using XML protocols?  I've
just been introduced to this new markup language, which in a sense is a
meta-markup language because it can be 'dumbed down' into an HTML
format.

XML has the advantage of giving the editor/encoder freedom to ascribe
specific attributes (read:  usage) to a given piece of text, which might
be a great help in clarifying questions like those raised by Foster.

As a neophyte who's only taken an introductory workshop in XML, I can't
speak to its full capabilities for future computer-based work, but it
seems to me that the kinds of questions Foster's work raises can best be
addressed by the next generation of encoding languages currently in
development.

Andy White

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Imtiaz Habib <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 28 Jan 2002 18:39:03 -0500
Subject: 13.0227 Re: SHAXICON Meets SHAXICAN
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0227 Re: SHAXICON Meets SHAXICAN

Didn't he also correctly identify the "Una bomber?" And, aren't the some
of the results of SHAXICON otherwise consistent with the independent
information of traditional scholarship and traditional assumptions (e.g.
that Shakespeare played Adam in AYLI and the ghost in Hamlet?)

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steve Roth <
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Date:           Monday, 28 Jan 2002 18:23:48 -0800
Subject: 13.0227 Re: SHAXICON Meets SHAXICAN
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0227 Re: SHAXICON Meets SHAXICAN

Martin Steward wrote,

>Foster did correctly identify Joel Stein as the author of "Primary
>Colors", non?

Joe Klein. Right.

>Not that I buy the idea that "Funeral Elegy" is by WS, unless he was
>pissing about when he wrote it.

Not the most engaging work by my lights, either (though there is a
certain density and complexity of composition that's interesting and
Shakespeare-like). Foster has himself called it "a long rather dull
elegy."

But nobody that I'm aware of has engaged Foster's Elegy work on its own
level--the painstaking lexical analysis. It's quite easy to say,
"Elegy's not very good so Shakespeare couldn't have written it," but
those kind of facile statements do not, in my opinion, have much value.

Foster's '89 book is well worth reading--really quite brilliant
scholarship, IMHO. It's contributed a great deal to my understanding and
appreciation of Shakespeare's language (check out, for instance, the
discussion of Shakespeare's (almost-) unique use of hendiadys), and it's
a veritable casebook and textbook on the uses and abuses of
lexical/internal evidence for purposes of attribution.

It's a book that only Shakespeare dweebs could love, but if you resemble
that remark, check it out. It's pretty much fun.

Steve

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