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Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: March ::
Re: Shakespeare's Will
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0650  Tuesday, 5 March 2002

[1]     From:   David Knauer <
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        Date:   Monday, 04 Mar 2002 11:35:06 -0600
        Subj:   Re: Shakespeare's Will

[2]     From:   Larry Weiss <
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        Date:   Monday, 04 Mar 2002 14:54:32 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0622 Re: Shakespeare's Will


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Knauer <
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Date:           Monday, 04 Mar 2002 11:35:06 -0600
Subject:        Re: Shakespeare's Will

For a really good treatment of Renaissance handwriting styles, may I
recommend:

_Writing matter : from the hands of the English Renaissance_, by
Jonathan Goldberg (Stanford UP, 1990)? Lots of facsimile repros of
secretary, italianate, and other hands to compare, as I recall.

Dave

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <
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Date:           Monday, 04 Mar 2002 14:54:32 -0500
Subject: 13.0622 Re: Shakespeare's Will
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0622 Re: Shakespeare's Will

> Either I misunderstand what you are saying or we are talking about
> different books.  In his 1984 book "In Search of Shakespeare" Hamilton
> presents an entire chapter on Hand D, and examines the handwriting in
> some detail.  He concludes Hand D was Shakespeare's.

We are talking about different books.  In a c.1994 book called
"Cardenio" Hamilton argued that this lost play was The Second Maiden's
Tragedy, and he based his argument on asserted similarities between the
MS and WS's will.  Even though Hamilton had earlier concluded that Hand
D was WS's autograph, he makes no mention of Hand D in the Cardenio
book.  I found this odd and asked Hamilton about it, only to receive the
even more peculiar response that he was not relying on handwriting
similarities (even though his book says he did), but on stylistic
similarities.  As I noted in my earlier post it is even harder to find
stylistic similarities between Second Maiden and anything WS wrote than
it would be to find similar handwriting.

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