Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: March ::
Re: The Laws of Theatre
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0653  Tuesday, 5 March 2002

[1]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 04 Mar 2002 13:20:15 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0632 The Laws of Theatre

[2]     From:   Larry Weiss <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 04 Mar 2002 14:16:53 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0632 The Laws of Theatre

[3]     From:   Paul E. Doniger <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 4 Mar 2002 19:33:54 -0500
        Subj:   SHK 13.0632 The Laws of Theatre


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 04 Mar 2002 13:20:15 -0500
Subject: 13.0632 The Laws of Theatre
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0632 The Laws of Theatre

Martin,

I'm dubious about most "laws" of the theatre, especially when they aim
at limiting audience response. When I was a student, I was recurrently
told that I was not "supposed" to have certain reactions or ask certain
questions. Now that I'm a teacher I'll react any damned way I please and
ask any questions I want.

That's what I was getting at.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 04 Mar 2002 14:16:53 -0500
Subject: 13.0632 The Laws of Theatre
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0632 The Laws of Theatre

> "What are the laws of the theatre? Has anyone codified them? "

> Shakespeare - Hamlet, Prince of Denmark [only kidding]

Why "only kidding"?  As Hamlet's advice to the players elucidates
neither the plot nor the character to any significant extent, and as it
is prose so it is not likely to have been included as a poetic etude,
the speech can be regarded as a pithy little essay by Shakespeare on the
requirements of good theatre.  And who better to express a view on the
subject?

If we consider the speech as the author's opinion, we find that WS was a
member of the naturalistic school, a fact which may help in our
understanding of what he wrote and why.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul E. Doniger <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 4 Mar 2002 19:33:54 -0500
Subject: The Laws of Theatre
Comment:        SHK 13.0632 The Laws of Theatre

How about Thomas Heywood. _An Apology for Actors_ (1612). Then there was
_A Refutation of the Apology for Actors_ by I.G. (maybe John Greene --
1615).

Paul E. Doniger

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.