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Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: March ::
Re: Plot and Character Parallels
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.07378  Tuesday, 12 March 2002

[1]     From:   W.L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Monday, 11 Mar 2002 16:13:04 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0731 Re: Plot and Character Parallels

[2]     From:   Brian Willis <
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        Date:   Monday, 11 Mar 2002 16:00:55 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0731 Re: Plot and Character Parallels


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W.L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Monday, 11 Mar 2002 16:13:04 -0500
Subject: 13.0731 Re: Plot and Character Parallels
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0731 Re: Plot and Character Parallels

Clifford Stetner writes:

>Moreover, Shakespeare
>shows us that Ferdinand's true noblesse consists of the purity of his
>love for Miranda in contrast to the lustful rapine of Caliban.

Maybe, but Ferdinand says, "Full many a lady/I have eyed with best
regard" (3.1.39-40). And Prospero feels that he has to warn Ferdinand
against breaking Miranda's virgin-knot before the sactimonious
ceremonies are performed. How pure is he?

After all, Ferdinand is a royal prince and no doubt would find "willing
dames enough" (Macbeth 4.3.73). Perhaps he's an experience woodman who
is turned on by Miranda's inexperience. There are such -- I've been told
-- who, like Angelo, desire women foully for those things that make them
good (Measure 2.2.173-4).

Yours, Bill Godshalk

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brian Willis <
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Date:           Monday, 11 Mar 2002 16:00:55 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 13.0731 Re: Plot and Character Parallels
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0731 Re: Plot and Character Parallels

Don't forget the vast amount of foils in Lear alone: Lear against
Gloucester, Edmund and Edgar against Goneril/Regan and Cordelia, Kent
against the Fool - one openly subversive and the other clandestine, Kent
and the second servant - both servant interveners in acts of cruel
separation, France and Burgandy against Albany and Cornwall - one
earthly and one realizing inner value, Poor Tom against the Fool - two
clowns, both spewing profound gibberish in the fierce storm.

Part of the reason that Hamlet and Lear are considered the two greatest
plays is that they both are permeated with these parallel plot
structures.  Lear alone recreates two entire families, complete with
parallel missing mothers.

Brian Willis

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