2002

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.07395  Thursday, 14 March 2002

[1]     From:   John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 13 Mar 2002 08:38:48 -0000
        Subj:   RE: SHK 13.07366 Re: A Renaissance in Need of Reform

[2]     From:   Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 13 Mar 2002 13:21:48 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.07385 Re: A Renaissance in Need of Reform


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 13 Mar 2002 08:38:48 -0000
Subject: 13.07366 Re: A Renaissance in Need of Reform
Comment:        RE: SHK 13.07366 Re: A Renaissance in Need of Reform

One should not overlook a conscious factor in the authorship of papers.
There is the famous instance of George Gamow, when he and his student
Alpher had written an important paper on the origin of the chemical
elements, persuading Hans Bethe to put his name to it.

This ensured that the paper (still cited to this day) was by Alpher,
Bethe and Gamow.

John Briggs

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 13 Mar 2002 13:21:48 -0500
Subject: 13.07385 Re: A Renaissance in Need of Reform
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.07385 Re: A Renaissance in Need of Reform

> Brain Willis's point is well-taken (that film adaptations of Shakespeare
> are the Late 20th Century equivalents of the Restoration adaptations),

I'm not so sure.  Cibber, Tate, et al., felt they were making necessary
improvements:  Shakespeare got it wrong -- for example, it is obvious
that Cordelia and Edgar were made for each other -- and it fell to them
to fix it.  Film directors may believe that their adaptations make the
plays more understandable, enjoyable, "commercial"  or (worst of all)
"relevant" to some undisclosed referent, but I don't think they are so
presumptuous as to suggest that they are improving the plays for all
time.

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