Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: March ::
Re: Proto-Catholics? Proto-Prods
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0833  Tuesday, 19 March 2002

[1]     From:   David Evett <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 18 Mar 2002 12:37:46 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0814 Re: Proto-Catholics? Proto-Prods

[2]     From:   Daphne Pearson <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 18 Mar 2002 18:44:22 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0822 Re: Proto-Catholics? Proto-Prods

[3]     From:   Bill Arnold <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 18 Mar 2002 16:57:35 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0822 Re: Proto-Catholics? Proto-P


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 18 Mar 2002 12:37:46 -0500
Subject: 13.0814 Re: Proto-Catholics? Proto-Prods
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0814 Re: Proto-Catholics? Proto-Prods

Markus Marti's proposition that the "Anglican church [I take it he means
the Church of England--the term "Anglican" arose later when other
national or regional churches more or less fully sharing the theology
and polity of the C of E had come into being] was built on the stones of
Henry VIII" (in the testicular sense of that word?) is radically
simplistic, and his supposition that the only difference between that
church and the Church of Rome concerns attitudes toward ritual is simply
wrong. Mr. Marti should read some good brief history of the church; a
seminary professor I know recommends Neill, Stephen.  Anglicanism.  New
York: Oxford University Press, 1982.  Or maybe Diarmid MacCullough's new
biography of Edward VI.

David Evett

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Daphne Pearson <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 18 Mar 2002 18:44:22 +0000
Subject: 13.0822 Re: Proto-Catholics? Proto-Prods
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0822 Re: Proto-Catholics? Proto-Prods

Re the question on Exeter and its bishops, Eamonn Duffy's 'Voices of
Morebath', Yale UP, 2001, has a section on the Prayerbook Rebellion in
the west of England.

Daphne Pearson

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Arnold <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 18 Mar 2002 16:57:35 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 13.0822 Re: Proto-Catholics? Proto-Prods
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0822 Re: Proto-Catholics? Proto-Prods

Susan C Oldrieve quotes me, "Which raises a question in my mind, what
was the relationship between Exeter Cathedral, its Bishops, and the
Plantagenets?  Was it Catholic, then Anglican?  I remember a reference
to an early Bishop from EC and one of the Plantagenets, and their
indebtedness to each other.  Does anyone know?  Can a source be cited?"

Then she writes, "I ran Bill Arnold's question past my history colleague
Connie Evans (
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 ) who has done work on Exeter, and this is
what she had to say: The problem with the Exeter bishops is that a lot
of the material relevant to them is pretty sketchy.  My first diss topic
WAS the Exeter bishops and I got over there to find out there was a
dearth of material.  In the event, most of the Exeter bishops were very
political creatures and had close relationships with the monarchs,
though I can't speak to specifics, since I'm not an expert.  As to the
transformation to Anglicanism, that was a bumpy road in Exeter (see:
Prayer Book Rebellion of 1549, though that was mostly directed at
Somerset and his policies). The best short view is found in Wallace
MacCaffrey's *Exeter, 1540-1640* which has a short chapter on Exeter and
the Reformation.  They might also find Robert Whiting's "The Blind
Devotion of the People" helpful for the region in general.  Another
helpful book might be "The Church and the English Crown, 1305-1334" by
J. Robert Wright. Without specifics, these would be the best place to
start.  Susan Oldrieve  Baldwin-Wallace College."

Thank you so very much, and I am with my intellectual nose fresh on the
hunt.

Bill Arnold

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.