2002

Call for Papers

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0872  Thursday, 28 March 2002

From:           Karen Bamford <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 27 Mar 2002 09:51:10 -0400
Subject:        Call for Papers

CFP: Folktales and Early Modern Texts (05/01/02; 03/28-30/03 RSA). For a
panel at the Renaissance Society of America conference in Toronto, March
28-30, 2003, proposals for papers on the relationship between folktales
and early modern texts of any genre. Send abstracts (250 words) by May
1, 2002 to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Karen Bamford

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Speaking of Shakespeare with F. Murray Abraham

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0871  Thursday, 28 March 2002

From:           John Andrews <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 26 Mar 2002 21:13:08 -0800
Subject:        Speaking of Shakespeare with F. Murray Abraham

Speaking of Shakespeare - And Maybe Some Salieri - With F. Murray
Abraham

                            Monday, April 1, at 8:00 p.m.
                            The National Arts Club
                            15 Gramercy Park South
                            New York City

F. Murray Abraham is best known, of course, for his brilliant portrayal
of the envious Salieri in Milos Forman's classic 1984 film "Amadeus."
For this role he earned both an Academy Award and a Golden Globe trophy.
He's also appeared in dozens of other films, among them "The Name of the
Rose" (1986), "Last Action Hero" (1993), and "Finding Forrester" (2000).

What Mr. Abraham's admirers may be less familiar with are the stage
protagonists he's depicted, among them Bottom, Creon, Cyrano, Iago,
Lear, Macbeth, Malvolio, and Uncle Vanya. He'll talk about these and
other figures during a dialogue that explores some of the qualities Mike
Nichols was looking for when he cast Abraham in a celebrated 1988
revival of "Waiting for Godot" that also starred Steve Martin and Robin
Williams.

Admission to this gathering, which will be followed by a light dessert
reception, is $25. To reserve space(s) and arrange for payment by credit
card or check, please contact John F. Andrews of The Shakespeare Guild
at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call (202) 483-8646.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Men in Tights

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0869  Thursday, 28 March 2002

From:           Karen Peterson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 25 Mar 2002 15:35:05 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Men in Tights

Brian Willis wrote,

> Any attempt at
> variation or updating of the play meets with harsh
> criticism from
> conservative circles. I'm sure that some people even
> refuse to accept a
> production that doesn't perform in period costuming.

Just back from the SAA and trying to get through the accumulated
messages.  Brian's response sparked a question.

Are any of the established, professional groups which do Shakespeare (in
any part of the planet) actually doing Shakespeare in period costuming
these days?  All the performances I have seen in the past few years have
been "updated" or alternatively, "stylized", as far as costuming goes,
the most popular trend being a kind of vaguely Italianate-Fascist
style.  But then, I don't see that many productions beyond the
London-Stratford axis.  I'm curious about what other more experienced
and far-flung playgoing listgoers have seen recently.  Do men in tights
(not to mention women in wimples!) still tread upon the boards?

Curiously yours,
Karen

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

PBS Kurasowa

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0870  Thursday, 28 March 2002

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 26 Mar 2002 20:18:56 -0500
Subject:        PBS Kurasowa

A PBS special on Akira Kurasowa was scheduled, according to ET Weekly,
to air last Thursday at 9.  It did not air on my two PBS stations.
Anyone see it?

R

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: Film and Other Adaptations

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0868  Thursday, 28 March 2002

[1]     From:   Janet Costa <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 20 Mar 2002 12:25:47 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0851 Re: Film and Other Adaptations

[2]     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 20 Mar 2002 17:08:22 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0851 Re: Film and Other Adaptations

[3]     From:   Susanne Collier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 21 Mar 2002 17:04:26 -0800
        Subj:   RE: SHK 13.0851 Re: Film and Other Adaptations


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Janet Costa <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 20 Mar 2002 12:25:47 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 13.0851 Re: Film and Other Adaptations
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0851 Re: Film and Other Adaptations

In response to Mari Bonomi's comments on an RnJ interpretation, I was
reminded of a performance by the English Shakespeare Company's Education
Department. It was a sci-fi treatment and very well received by the
teenage audience. I think the key to her comments is the statement "I am
a conservative'. No where does WS offer a definition of 'dignity', as
with many other descriptive terms throughout the play. The Montagues and
the Capulets are simply 'two households in fair Verona'. Most of the
'conservative' interpretations rely heavily on sources outside WS's play
and on the Victorian presentations, not WS. Therefore, the door is open
to portray them as whatever social classes may seem relevant to the
director, as in the last two productions at the RSC.

The modern playwrights mentioned, Ibsen, Williams, and Miller (and
probably most especially Williams), do not leave this kind of room for
interpretation. In Ibsen, there is only one way for A Doll's House to
end: Nora must close the door. Williams' stage directions are sometimes
more poetic than the text of the play itself. The Glass Menagerie,
Suddenly Last Summer, and A Streetcar Named Desire all have very
specific demands made by Williams himself. For him, these demands, such
as the apratment, the conservatory, and the tenement, reflect both on
the plays as a whole and the actions of the characters. Miller, as a
still living playwright, has some control over how his plays are
presented. The Crucible can only be in Massacusetts during the witch
trials, and Incident at Vichy can only be in that train station with
Nazis. In my directorial experience, Tom Stoppard is one playwright
familiar enough with the actual workings of the stage to give some
flexibility to interpretation, but not very much. David Mamet too holds
his plays in tight rein.

However, when it comes to WS, the evolution of stage space and
technology not only allows what some might call 'tinkering' with the
text, but in some staging, demands it. How do you stage a heath and the
witches in the Scottish play? How does Marina come out of the sea? How
does Hermione come back to life? Somehow it all takes you back to the
Chorus at the beginning of Henry V and 'your imaginary forces'.

And it is here that I think Brian Willis in his comments reminds us
quite firmly that just as theatre practice itself is not written in
stone, film as its 'sometime sister' should not be confined by
prejudices toward execution. I think Brian is simply asking for filmed
Shakespeare to be given the advantage of analysis by open minds, not
burdened with the baggage of instituitonalised performance history,
custom, and conservatism.  Film and adaptations are to performance what
Lewis and Clark were to exploration: vehicles to discover anew and
're-see' Shakespeare.

Janet

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 20 Mar 2002 17:08:22 -0800
Subject: 13.0851 Re: Film and Other Adaptations
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0851 Re: Film and Other Adaptations

David Wallace reports that

>for me, the film [O] adhered so closely to Othello in its structure that the
>ghost of Shakespeare's play kept superimposing itself over every scene.
>In each instance that the film directly echoed a scene from the play I
>found the dialogue especially tired and trite. I teach in a high school
>and the dialogue assigned these characters bears small resemblance to
>the colourful, profane, and idiomatic dialect spoken by my students. I
>could have more readily tucked Shakespeare's verse to the back of my
>mind had the dialogue in the film more successfully captured the poetry
>of the youthful jargon I am already accustomed to hearing. The dialogue
>felt flat and generic.

I thought it wonderfully restrained, as when Hugo responds to Odin's
plans to kill Desi with "That's a big step", or when he responds to
Emilia's "I have a thing for you" with "You have a thing for a lot of
guys".  I just quoted Desi's father's explanation that "she lied to me"
to my class this afternoon.

The strongest part, really, struck me as the ending, with Odin's
complete incomprehension of Hugo's (still, apparently) motiveless
malignancy, and his insistence on being remembered as a victim, not just
a black kid who went nuts.  "Report me as I am" never made more sense.
Overall, I seriously think that this is one of the best Shakespeare
adaptations since Kurosawa died.

While I'm responding to this digest, I would like to respond to Mari
Bonomi's posting, simply by hoping that the production she describes
rises to the philosophical heights of the Matrix (imagine Plato's cave
run by Descartes's evil genius) or Bladerunner (I always think of an
essay by Cavell, not about Shakespeare but about how to tell a robot
from a real person).

Cheers,
Se


Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.