2002

CFP-Extended Deadline

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0621  Monday, 4 March 2002

From:           Charles Whitney <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 01 Mar 2002 08:51:30 -0800
Subject:        CFP-Extended Deadline

_________________________
_________RMMRA__________

 Extended Call for Papers: Las Vegas

34th annual meeting of the
Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Assn.
        University of Nevada      May 23-25, 2002

Plenary speakers:

Terence Hawkes, English, University of Cardiff, Wales
Wole Soyinka, Nobel Laureate and Director, International Institute of
            Modern Letters, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Diane Wolfthal, Art History, Arizona State University

>>Topic Open<<
You are cordially invited to submit abstracts for papers and session
proposals either on the conference theme or on any topic in medieval,
Renaissance, or early modern studies.  "The Presence of the Past"
concerns questions such as these: in what ways are images, artifacts,
and institutions of the medieval and early modern periods part of the
contemporary world?  What valid parallels or narratives connect these
periods to the world today?  How can we address our own historical and
cultural situatedness?  How did medieval and early modern cultures
themselves apprehend and address the presence of the past?

EXTENDED DEADLINE:  Individual and panel submissions will be reviewed as
received until April 1, 2002

Please send session proposals or one-page abstracts  to: Prof. Elspeth
Whitney, Dept. of History, Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
(note e-mail address change)
fax:  702-895-1782    phone: 702-895-3350      address: Las Vegas, NV
89154-5020.

Questions?  Contact Prof. Charles Whitney, Dept. of English, UNLV
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (note e-mail address change) phone  702-895-3920

If you wish to chair a session please so indicate and include your area
of interest.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: Time Placement

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0620  Monday, 4 March 2002

[1]     From:   Karen Peterson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 1 Mar 2002 08:11:05 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0606 Time Placement

[2]     From:   Arthur Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 2 Mar 2002 10:46:02 +0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0606 Time Placement

[3]     From:   Martin Steward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 2 Mar 2002 10:24:53 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0606 Time Placement

[4]     From:   Brandon Toropov <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 2 Mar 2002 09:51:56 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0606 Time Placement


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Karen Peterson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 1 Mar 2002 08:11:05 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 13.0606 Time Placement
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0606 Time Placement

> What would have become of WS if he had been born in
> 1950?

In his late teens, after completing his secondary education with
competency, although not with the distinction necessary to win him a
place at uni, he would have migrated from the Midlands to London.  After
knocking about the theatre world and doing some bit parts for TV, he
would have become a writer for the BBC adapting "classics" into costume
drama.  Then, having received a more lucrative offer from ITV or Channel
4, along with the opportunity to do more innovative work, he moves into
"hard-hitting contemporary" dramas.  He wins some awards, and can buy a
pretty nice house back in Stratford, but no one's stopping him on the
street for his autograph.  Along the way he publishes a couple of
critically well-received "slim volumes" of verse.  They do not sell well
(slim volumes rarely do) and are now out of print.

Cheers,
Karen

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Arthur Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 2 Mar 2002 10:46:02 +0800
Subject: 13.0606 Time Placement
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0606 Time Placement

He would eventually have written a screenplay called Stoppard in Love?

Arthur Lindley

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Steward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 2 Mar 2002 10:24:53 -0000
Subject: 13.0606 Time Placement
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0606 Time Placement

"What would have become of WS if he had been born in 1950?" Jim Slager
wonders. Well, it's obvious, isn't it? Either a) the producer of
historical drama films in the Merchant-Ivory mould or b) an advertising
copywriter.

m

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brandon Toropov <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 2 Mar 2002 09:51:56 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 13.0606 Time Placement
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0606 Time Placement

> What would have become of WS if he had been born in
> 1950?
>
> Regards,
> Jim Slager

One common answer is that he would have been a commercially successful
screenwriter, but I have my doubts. The screenwriting form is
historically unfriendly to writers who rely on extended speeches.
Examples of major-studio green-light decisions that overcome this
prejudice are rare, I think, and include entries (such as the woefully
underrated MAGNOLIA) that never broke through as "mainstream" smasheroos
... probably because they required that modern movie audience pay
attention to ideas not presented in bite-sized chunks.

(Please forgive the following side note: One idiotic reviewer of
MAGNOLIA attacked its script's two paterfamilias cancer victims, arguing
that this repetition was, by definition, a sign of sloppy and
unimaginative writing. Presumably the similarity of the Lear and Gloster
plots would have earned the same criticism.)

My bet: Today, Shakesepare would be writing and producing greate playes
-- and, prhappes, attractyng noteyce for inconstantt spellynge that
woold challynge even ye sleekest spelle-checke softeware.

Brandon

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: Medium & Message

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0618  Monday, 4 March 2002

[1]     From:   Doug Buchanan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 01 Mar 2002 10:35:52 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0589 Re: Medium & Message, Fact and "History"

[2]     From:   R. A. Cantrell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 01 Mar 2002 10:56:23 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0611 Re: Medium & Message, Fact and "History"

[3]     From:   Jim Slager <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 1 Mar 2002 10:09:47 -0800
        Subj:   Re: Stage, Screen, TV or Radio?


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Doug Buchanan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 01 Mar 2002 10:35:52 -0500
Subject: 13.0589 Re: Medium & Message, Fact and "History"
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0589 Re: Medium & Message, Fact and "History"

When Sting retires, will he be Stung?

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           R. A. Cantrell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 01 Mar 2002 10:56:23 -0600
Subject: 13.0611 Re: Medium & Message, Fact and "History"
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0611 Re: Medium & Message, Fact and "History"

>Thanks  Martin.
> Sean Lawrence, responding favourably to a previous post by R. A.
> Cantrell, asked, "could we even recognize a "(truer) world" without some
> sense of the true?  Can we have comparatives without at least some
> intuition of absolutes?" R. A. Cantrell replied, "See Augustine, St. THE
> UTILITY OF BELIEF; Heidegger, M. Sein und Zeit". I am amused to imagine
> every list member scurrying away to get copies of Heidegger in the
> original German.

Academic fire drill at it's finest.

> On the Augustine, I would oppose Cantrell's selection
> with the passages about the non-existence of evil in Book VII of
> "Confessions", especially xii and xiii

I've read all of Augustine except the Confessions, which I am saving for
my old age. The utility of belief takes up pre-cognition in a very
useful way.  Heidegger takes it up, but it's like pulling teeth to get
round to it.

> (pp.124ff. in the World's
> Classics edition translated by Henry Chadwick, 1992). As for "Being and
> Time", I'm not sure Heidegger's pre-Socratic phenomenology replaces its
> destruction of "intuition of absolutes" with a sense of "comparatives".
> Was not the notion that there were categories that could be put to the
> service of comparison just the sort of Aritotelian (or, more to the
> point, Kantian) paradigm that this sort of hermeneutics was developed to
> challenge? I think my namesake agrees with Sean on that one (but who
> would dare to suggest they know what Heidegger actually means...?)

me. H was a knowing fraud who was quite surprised at having duped his
faculty and thereafter just ran with it. S&Z is an intentionally
obscured apology for animism, with a roughly 100x on word found to word
needed basis.

> Sean wrote that R. A. Cantrell "quoted British pop culture", which got
> the response, "Not of a purpose I didn't, Mr. Dillon". I think that was
> because Sean forgot that it was I who quoted from "1066 and all That",
> mischievous source of the quote which has led rather surprisingly to
> this abstruse discussion and these frightening references. Sellars and
> Yeatman would be highly amused. But that is no more than they deserve!
If I quote from popular culture (knowingly) it will much more likely be
Festus Hagen than Sting. Though I do ( I think) enjoy Sting's music (if
it
is not annoying me at the moment).

Fight , fight , fight, I am behind you 103%

Your Amigo,
Lazlo Toth

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jim Slager <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 1 Mar 2002 10:09:47 -0800
Subject:        Re: Stage, Screen, TV or Radio?

Sam Small writes,

>Some on this list have said that
>radio is the best medium for Shakespeare - and I have some sympathy for
>that.  However, I want to see the face - close-up and personal - of an
>actor or actress taking on the character and struggling with the pain
>for my sake.  I want to see their eyes and hear the words - that's all I
>want - and television is the only medium that delivers that perfectly.

I'm quite surprised by this.  Wouldn't a good seat in a small theater
for a live production give you what you want better than television?

My list of best mediums for Shakespeare is:

1. Live (with good seat in small theater).
2. Audio with good production (Arkangel).
3. Live (with not so good seat or small theater).
4. Movie with big screen and lots of effects.
5. DVD on TV
6. Everything else.

I especially enjoy the Arkangel audio cassettes (wish they had CDs)
because it delivers the language so powerfully.  Obviously they have to
deliver language since there is no video but they clearly design the
whole operation from the beginning in order to deliver audio.  This is
one million miles away from staging a live production and recording the
audio.  (I wish I knew how to describe this better.)  The other
wonderful thing about audio is that it allows you to study and enjoy
Shakespeare while locked in your car.   I view audio as the last step in
preparation for seeing a play live for the first time.

Regards,
Jim Slager

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

MacHomer

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0619  Monday, 4 March 2002

From:           Marcia Eppich-Harris <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 1 Mar 2002 11:08:53 -0500
Subject:        MacHomer

Hi everyone,

We've mentioned a few offshoots lately, so I thought I would also give a
heads up about an adaptation that I saw last weekend. It's called
MacHomer, and it's a one-man performance of Macbeth using the voices
from the Simpson's. What a show! I thoroughly enjoyed it. My husband,
who is a bigger Simpson's fan than I, thought it was a little too
"busy", but he enjoyed it as well. The actor, Rick Miller, is a fabulous
impersonator. The end left a little to be desired: he sang "We Are the
World" using the Simpson's voices, and then the very end was his version
of "Bohemian Rhapsody" featuring "the 25 most annoying voices in rock n'
roll"; both songs, obviously, have nothing to do with Macbeth. But the
actual adaptation of Macbeth itself is very funny, and if you know the
Simpson's, it's even more of a hoot. There is a website for MacHomer as
well. The link is as follows: http://www.machomer.com/

Cheers!
Marcia

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Hotel O -- Adult Spin-off of Othello

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0617  Friday, 1 March 2002

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 1 Mar 2002 10:00:36 -0500
Subject:        Hotel O -- Adult Spin-off of Othello

An adult feature comic spin-off of Othello called Hotel O has been
greenlighted by Video Team (who did the R and J adult spin-off, West
Side, and My Baby Got Back #27, with a scene in which Hamlet is being
rehearsed).  Veteran and award winner Roy Karch will direct; Nina
Hartley and Lexington Steele will star. Hotel O puts the "Ho" into
"Othello" and is set in Venice, CA.  O.T. (Othello) and Dr. Go (Iago)
are undercover rogue cops working as pimps in a local hotel (called
Hotel O). The premise is that Iago is right in every case he suspects
infidelity--Moana (Desdemona), Lil' M (Emilia), Byonce (Bianca), and
Cass (Cassio) are all sleeping around. O.T. and Moana turn out to be
swingers, making a comic ending possible. Production is set for early
April.  The film should be out in late Spring or early Summer.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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