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Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: April ::
Re: Plagiarism and Update
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0937  Thursday, 4 April 2002

[1]     From:   Thomas Larque <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 3 Apr 2002 17:57:12 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0926 Re: Plagiarism and Update

[2]     From:   Martin Steward <
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        Date:   Thursday, 4 Apr 2002 11:25:04 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0926 Re: Plagiarism and Update

[3]     From:   Gabriel Egan <
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        Date:   Thursday, 4 Apr 2002 13:03:31 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0926 Re: Plagiarism and Update


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thomas Larque <
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Date:           Wednesday, 3 Apr 2002 17:57:12 +0100
Subject: 13.0926 Re: Plagiarism and Update
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0926 Re: Plagiarism and Update

> Academic Integrity
> (http://www.academicintegrity.org/) estimates the plagiarism rate at
> 75%.

Surely this can't be true.  I am a student and I have never knowingly
committed plagiarism.  So far my seminar groups have varied between two
students and about eight.  Does this mean that absolutely everybody
apart from me and - if I'm lucky - one other student in my largest
seminar group routinely plagiarises every essay?  Or that *all*
students, including me - somehow without my noticing - write *some*
plagiarised essays, and take turns to be the honest one in four?

If there is any basis for this statistic then this is a tragic comment
on education, but I am optimistic enough to hope that I am not the only
honest student in all of my seminars, and that I am not lying to
myself.  Could it really be possible that one in four of the former or
current students on this list was guilty of plagiarism (is anybody
willing to make that admission)?  Surely rather more than one in four of
us actually buckled down and did the work ourselves.

Thomas Larque.
"Shakespeare and His Critics"
http://shakespearean.org.uk

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Steward <
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Date:           Thursday, 4 Apr 2002 11:25:04 +0100
Subject: 13.0926 Re: Plagiarism and Update
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0926 Re: Plagiarism and Update

There's a lot to be said for learning how to beat systems. They are
usually pernicious. To pretend that the systems promulgated by
university English departments are any different is insufferably
Ivory-Towerish. Discipline is for the unimaginative, mankind is
something to be overcome!

m

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <
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Date:           Thursday, 4 Apr 2002 13:03:31 +0100
Subject: 13.0926 Re: Plagiarism and Update
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0926 Re: Plagiarism and Update

Peter Paolucci wrote about plagiarism

> 6/ The use of de-skilling learnware like Web CT, Lotus Notes
> Quick Place and MANY others, is increasingly popular because
> all that's required is superficial knowledge of the Learnware
> environment itself. It holds the promise of modestly good results
> without demanding any substantive, open standards technological
> expertise. We put courses online without insisting that students or
> faculty have any quantifiable training on Internet technologies. When
> students become frustrated, they are more inclined to cheat.

Agreed. Wonderful open standards such as HTTP, HTML, and ISO9660 (which
allows home-authored CDs to work on any computer) allow teachers to
disseminate material (words, sounds, and pictures) at low cost and
everyone should be using them. Dreadful closed standards such as Peter
has named will look about as useful in 20 years time as an 8-track
cartridge does now.

> If I am correct in my hypothesis that plagiarism is fundamentally
> cultural, then it CANNOT be controlled or eliminated until we address
> the root causes.

Well, things can be controlled and eliminated without addressing their
root causes. (Medieval plague regulations worked despite ignorance of
the vector.) How about assessment by timed examination with no prior
disclosure?

Gabriel Egan

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