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Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: April ::
When Love Speaks
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1006  Wednesday, 10 April 2002

From:           Marcia Eppich-Harris <
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Date:           Tuesday, 9 Apr 2002 14:46:02 -0500
Subject:        When Love Speaks

Hi everyone,

I have recently received "When Love Speaks", the new compilation CD,
which if you don't already know if a collection of Shakespeare's writing
- almost all sonnets - being performed by different actors and singers.
I listened to it for the first time today, and I like it. Mostly. I was
a music major in my undergrad days and I've become sort of a snob about
music, so I wasn't too thrilled with a good many of the music
selections. Also, it seemed that some of the actors who read did so in
such a way as to draw out their particular sonnet out to seem about 28
lines long instead of the regular 14. Ah, the melodrama. My very
favorite was Ray Fiennes's recitation. I can't remember the sonnet
number off-hand, and I don't have the CD with me. But R. Fiennes read
the sonnet as it should have been read, with passion, acceleration, and
NOT like he was so very impressed with the sound of his own voice. (Not
like Branaugh's recitation.) Also, the CD comes with a book that has all
the sonnets printed out with the reader's name and the play from which
the passage comes (if it's not a sonnet). The very first recitation
comes from The Tempest, and Joseph Fiennes reads it, too quietly to hear
at first. Unfortunately, the speech is attributed to Prospero, but it is
Caliban's speech:

Do not afeard, the isle is full of noises,
Sounds and sweet airs that give delight and hurt not.
Sometimes a thousand twangling instruments
Will hum about mine ears, and sometime voices
that if I then had wak'd after long sleep
Will make me sleep again; and then in dreaming
the clouds methought would open and show riches
ready to drop upon me, that when I wak'd
I cried to dream again. (3.2.140-8)

Nice way to start, but it's certainly not Prospero who says this.
Anyway, I'm pretty easy to please, so I'm pleased with it. (I could
never be a good critic.) But I probably won't listen to the music tracks
very often.

Has anyone else gotten this CD? What are your thoughts?

Marcia

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