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Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: April ::
Re: Plagiarism and Update
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1033  Monday, 15 April 2002

[1]     From:   Robert Knapp <
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        Date:   Friday, 12 Apr 2002 10:11:37 PDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1016 Re: Plagiarism and Update

[2]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Friday, 12 Apr 2002 10:14:21 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1016 Re: Plagiarism and Update

[3]     From:   Don Bloom <
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        Date:   Friday, 12 Apr 2002 13:28:40 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0986 Re: Plagiarism and Update

[4]     From:   Martin Steward <
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        Date:   Saturday, 13 Apr 2002 13:35:06 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1016 Re: Plagiarism and Update

[5]     From:   Sam Small <
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        Date:   Sunday, 14 Apr 2002 14:05:27 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1016 Re: Plagiarism and Update


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert Knapp <
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Date:           Friday, 12 Apr 2002 10:11:37 PDT
Subject: 13.1016 Re: Plagiarism and Update
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1016 Re: Plagiarism and Update

As several postings on this topic have made clear, the real problem is
the factory-like conditions under which so many of us labor and learn.
Where the student/faculty ratio enables close attention to individual
students, making their process of composition something like our
own--with repeated drafts and genuine intellectual engagement between
writer and reader--plagiarism nearly disappears. At my own
institution--where an all student judicial board deals quite harshly
with plagiarism and cheating--most of the relatively few case occur in
introductory science courses, where enrollment is larger and to some
extent forced. Of course Reed is unspeakably lucky both in its funding
and its student culture. The national (and international) trends run
strongly against our elitist practices: the future seems to favor
distance learning and the digital police. In such an environment, it's
hard not to sympathize with students who treat credentialing in a wholly
instrumental way.

Robert Knapp

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Friday, 12 Apr 2002 10:14:21 -0700
Subject: 13.1016 Re: Plagiarism and Update
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1016 Re: Plagiarism and Update

Ed Taft suggests that

>Martin supposes a situation where legions of instructors are dedicated
>to making false accusations against students just to cause them trouble
>and, if possible, ruin their lives. Does he really think that such a
>situation exists? Did it ever exist?

Who cares?  Would it be legal?  Ought it to be?  One hardly needs to
develop paranoias about instructors in order to wish them to be held to
responsibility for their actions, just as one needn't think every police
officer Dirty Harry in order to want legal protection against their
capacity to abuse their positions of power.

>It is literally impossible for him or her to ferret out absolute proof
>for every case of plagiarism. What then should the teacher do?  What
>would Martin or Sean recommend?

It would only be necessary to severely punish those cases which can be
proven.  And if there is a true 'epidemic', as you contend, it shouldn't
be hard to prove many cases.  Automation could certainly be considered.
It also shouldn't be hard to tailor assignments such that they are
difficult to plagiarize.

Cheers,
Se

 

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