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Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: April ::
Re: Accents
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1065  Thursday, 18 April 2002

[1]     From:   Dana Shilling <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 17 Apr 2002 10:48:17 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1057 Re: Accents

[2]     From:   Chris Jacobs <
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        Date:   Thursday, 18 Apr 2002 08:38:54 +0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1057 Re: Accents


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Shilling <
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Date:           Wednesday, 17 Apr 2002 10:48:17 -0400
Subject: 13.1057 Re: Accents
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1057 Re: Accents

L.W. Brantley wrote that "the South owns Shakespeare"-- he was referring
to the Southern state of the US. However, I've read that the company
Northern Broadsides attracted a variety of responses to its productions
using the actors' non-BBC "regional" accents.

There are several instances in the Shakespearean text where the point is
precisely that people speak differently, e.g., Princess Katherine in
Henry V; Fluellen and Macmorris; the invented language of Parolles'
captors. It would be surprising if Francis the Drawer or Doll Tearsheet
had the same cut-glass accent as Prince Hal.

Dana Shilling

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Jacobs <
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Date:           Thursday, 18 Apr 2002 08:38:54 +0800
Subject: 13.1057 Re: Accents
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1057 Re: Accents

>As a proud member of the CSA, our Southern Confederacy here in America,
>I must say that the essence of our grace and civility, suits perfectly
>the fine notion that William Shakespeare's poetry, has indeed been made
>only more magnificent when spoken with  the inflection of a wonderfully
>seductive southern Tongue.

Dear SHAKSPERians,

It is interesting to note that, in the view of the illustrious John
Barton and many others of his ilk, the language spoken by actors of
Shakespeare's era, in all likelihood, spoke with pronunciations and
accents that had distinct flavours of those found in today's America.

Kindly,
Christopher Jacobs

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