Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: April ::
Re: Seeing Things
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1120  Wednesday, 24 April 2002

[1]     From:   W.L. Godshalk <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 23 Apr 2002 15:02:01 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1108 Re: Seeing Things

[2]     From:   Lisa Hopkins <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Apr 2002 09:47:38 +0100
        Subj:   Seeing things


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W.L. Godshalk <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 23 Apr 2002 15:02:01 -0400
Subject: 13.1108 Re: Seeing Things
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1108 Re: Seeing Things

Ear trumpets or speaking tubes were available in the seventeenth century
-- according to the Ear wax museum
[http://www.hearingcenteronline.com/museum.shtml].  Perhaps they were
available in the late sixteenth. And you might want to look at Bruce
Smith's Acoustic World of Early Modern England.

It's amusing to speculate that an audience in 1600 might exhibit a few
hundred ear trumpets!

Yours, Bill Godshalk

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lisa Hopkins <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Apr 2002 09:47:38 +0100
Subject:        Seeing things

>Martin Steward writes:
>
>"As someone who has worn glasses since I was eight years old, I do
>wonder what kind of world I would think I inhabited without them", muses
>Lisa Hopkins.
>
>A blurry one...?>

But the point is that I don't think I would know it was blurry: I might
trust the ocular proof rather than assuming that I had a vision
problem.  What would be interesting to know is not only to what extent
people suffered from eye defects, but to what extent they KNEW that they
did, and what ways they had of describing them.  To this end, the
suggestion of the Wellcome Trust is obviously a good one.  I also
remember the English guide at Chartres talking about the question of how
much of the detail of the cathedral people actually saw and what
measures were taken to maximise visibility, so I wonder whether there
might be relevant material in histories of ecclesiastical architecture.

I seem to remember (though I don't have references offhand) suggestions
that Shakespeare himself suffered from a serious vision defect in later
life, and I believe the death mask held in Germany appears to show the
symptoms of cancer of the eyelid - though unless someone's found
something out since I last heard about it, the identification of it as
Shakespeare's is wildly speculative.

Lisa Hopkins
Sheffield Hallam University

 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.