2002

Billy Connolly at The Globe

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1002  Wednesday, 10 April 2002

From:           Martin Steward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 9 Apr 2002 17:45:08 +0100
Subject:        Billy Connolly at The Globe

I saw an episode of "Billy Connolly's World Tour of Britain" (joke) last
night, BBC1. This week he was in London to do a gig at Shakespeare's
Globe.

He approached in a river-boat, and told us that this was how many of the
theatre-goers would have arrived.

Pshaw!

And he also said that the new theatre was built "exactly" as the
original had been.

! ! ! !  ? ? ? ! ! !

What is more, standing at the top of Westminster Tower next to Big Ben,
he came out with this incredible cock-and-bull story (pardon the pun)
about how Guy Fawkes (1570-1606) had his genitals crushed between
clapper and bell immediately after his arrest. This was delivered as if
it were documented truth! (The programme mixes comedy performance with
documentary travelogue).

Suddenly all the stuff I thought I'd learnt about Cork, Belfast,
Newcastle, etc. seemed worthless.

Looked like a funny gig, mind...

m

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Re: Plagiarism and Update

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1001  Wednesday, 10 April 2002

[1]     From:   Edmund Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 09 Apr 2002 12:38:00 -0400
        Subj:   Plagiarism and Update

[2]     From:   Martin Steward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 9 Apr 2002 17:30:18 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0986 Re: Plagiarism and Update

[3]     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 09 Apr 2002 11:11:00 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0986 Re: Plagiarism and Update


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Edmund Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 09 Apr 2002 12:38:00 -0400
Subject:        Plagiarism and Update

Larry Weiss writes:

"When the courts feel free to revise grades it is hardly surprising that
they will review disciplinary decisions.  Therefore, a teacher runs a
real risk of professional and financial ruin if she rejects a paper for
plagiarism but cannot prove it."

Right. Such an acute answer might lead one to believe that Larry is a
lawyer.

--Ed

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Steward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 9 Apr 2002 17:30:18 +0100
Subject: 13.0986 Re: Plagiarism and Update
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0986 Re: Plagiarism and Update

Goodness, isn't it shocking that students should be afforded the due
protection of the law against unjust and unfounded accusations, as is
their right and privilege? What is the world coming to?

Ed Taft writes, "What's happened, as I understand it, is that the burden
of proof has shifted from the student to the professor, and for two
reasons:
(1)     the lawyers for students and the administration see things this way,
and

(2) they see things this way because the students are the consumers and,
hence, are the parties to be protected".

No - they see things this way because the students are the ACCUSED. It
would be peculiar for the burden of proof to be concentrated on the
VICTIM of an accusation (and this is the only "victim" in any cause sub
judice). The sentiments at the heart of The Merchant of Venice are fine
onstage: in the big bad world, give me a legal system and a good lawyer
who understands it any day.

m

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 09 Apr 2002 11:11:00 -0700
Subject: 13.0986 Re: Plagiarism and Update
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0986 Re: Plagiarism and Update

Larry Weiss writes,

>The problem is that notions of due process, adequacy of proof and
>procedural fairness have invaded the halls of academe.  In the good old
>days schools were permitted a larger scope of arbitrariness than they
>have now.

I have to say that I thank God things are changing.  I would hate to
teach, much less be taught, in any institution where students were
presumed to be guilty, and could have their lives ruined at someone's
pleasure.  It would be like living under martial law.

Yours,
Se


Re: Romeo+Juliet=0

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0999  Wednesday, 10 April 2002

[1]     From:   Marcus Dahl <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 9 Apr 2002 12:07:13 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0990 Re: Romeo+Juliet=0

[2]     From:   David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 9 Apr 2002 15:34:40 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0990 Re: Romeo+Juliet=0


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marcus Dahl <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 9 Apr 2002 12:07:13 EDT
Subject: 13.0990 Re: Romeo+Juliet=0
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0990 Re: Romeo+Juliet=0

Dear All

I wonder if all the despisers of 'Romeo+Juliet' would have been equally
repelled by Verdi's Othello/ Falstaff or Beethoven's Fidelio in their
day...(or for that matter any musical / romantic / altered version of
Shakespeare) ...surely the reworking for the modern audience of a
Shakespeare play is rather good if people like it and there is a sense
(however diluted) of what the play might be about / for...(particularly
if the re-performance is inspired or inspires). For those of you who
have seen Luhrman's Moulin Rouge - it is interesting to think of the
modern musical / visual director as a kind of Guilbert and Sullivan of
Shakespeare - or for those who want to push it, as the producer of
modern Opera. Ok so Moulin Rouge is not La Boheme but I bet more people
this year have seen it, thought about it, sung along to the tunes than
saw the Opera in Covent Garden.

Though I'm not nearly so big a fan of the masses as might be supposed in
this case there is something to be said for the genius of the moment and
the transcription of the arts across time and into the popular
consciousness.

Best,
Marcus

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 9 Apr 2002 15:34:40 -0400
Subject: 13.0990 Re: Romeo+Juliet=0
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0990 Re: Romeo+Juliet=0

> I have one question here as it relates to this entire line of Movie vs.
> Stage heavyweight title bout that has been going on for the last few
> weeks: . . . Specifically based on the comments below, does this mean
>Shakespeare
> only works if done with a British accent and on an exact replica of the
> Globe

More precisely, in the accent(?s) of c. 1590-1615-whatever it/they might
have been, and using the theatrical conventions-speaking styles, acting
styles, costume styles, musical styles, audience behavior styles-of the
public theaters in London c. 1590-1615?  The question is a good one,
because it requires us to see that trying to retrieve some ideal
performance of *Shrew* or *Winter's Tale* is hopeless and perhaps
useless.  I have a question of my own for those on the list who have
seen most or all of the productions at the New Globe: at this stage do
you have any sense as to whether there has been any correlation between
success of productions (whatever that might mean) and intensity of
historicizing effort?  I can imagine the imposition of standards of
historicity having a positive effect on the production process:
inventive responses to arbitrary constraints of one kind and another lie
at the base of all successful art.  But they can also just make people
be clumsy or tired or angry.

I was interested to see Charles Weinstein retreat a little from his
blanket condemnation of filmed Shakespeare to particular distaste for
the acting of Leonardo DeCap and Inclement Danes.  But the things about
their work he despises are part and parcel of the whole Lurhmann
enterprise.

David Evett

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Another Version of R+J

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1000  Wednesday, 10 April 2002

From:           Ellen Steiber <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 09 Apr 2002 09:26:31 -0700
Subject:        Another Version of R+J

A friend recommended Jeanne Ray's *Julie and Romeo* to me, and though I
was initially skeptical of yet another takeoff, I found myself
thoroughly charmed by the novel.  In Ray's version Romeo and Julie are
both sixty years old and living in Somerville, MA.  They are rival
florists; their families hate each other, though no one can seem to
remember why; and they are hopelessly, desperately in love.  No, it's
not literature but it is a delightful twist on R+J and one of those rare
books that leaves you smiling.  (All right, maybe I shouldn't presume.
It left *me* smiling.)

Enjoy!

Ellen Steiber

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S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Dunciad

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0998  Wednesday, 10 April 2002

From:           Paul Franssen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 09 Apr 2002 17:46:56 +0200
Subject:        Dunciad

There is of course ONE thing to be said for reading the present age in
the light of Pope's apocalyptic *Dunciad*, and that is his prophetic
line foretelling the time when this disaster should come to pass: when
(once again) "Dunce the Second rules like Dunce the First." The allusion
in Pope's own time, of course, was to the first two Georges . . .

Paul Franssen

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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