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Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: May ::
Re: Edgar and Edmund
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1210  Wednesday, 1 May 2002

[1]     From:   Larry Weiss <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Apr 2002 17:56:57 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1193 Re: Edgar and Edmund

[2]     From:   Brian Willis <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Apr 2002 17:38:13 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1193 Re: Edgar and Edmund


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <
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Date:           Tuesday, 30 Apr 2002 17:56:57 -0400
Subject: 13.1193 Re: Edgar and Edmund
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1193 Re: Edgar and Edmund

>  Mustn't a true "third"
> be defined as 33.333%? Of course, it's possible to interpret the word
> otherwise, but that just seems like another one of those weird
> ambiguities that characterize Lear's thinking in this scene.

If you were to divide Britain into three equal areas by drawing lines of
latitude across the island, the third below the southern line would be
far more opulent than the third above the northern line.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brian Willis <
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Date:           Tuesday, 30 Apr 2002 17:38:13 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 13.1193 Re: Edgar and Edmund
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1193 Re: Edgar and Edmund

I think some of the things that Edmund is reading into the play are
simply convenient stage directions and placings. Should Gloucester be
carried into battle?

No, he is carried onto stage so that Edgar can run back detailing the
swift defeat in the battle. Just as importantly, it gives us one last
glimpse of Gloucester and Edgar together, which Shakespeare also
gloriously affords to Lear and Cordelia.

 >"Edgar's words point one way, but his actions
>point another; his words show love, but his actions,
>by and large, show hate".

Again, I don't believe so. I've pointed out some instances in the text
where this not true. I don't know of a single instance in Shakespeare
where a character gives no verbal indication at all of his hate or
villainy and then turns on his friends, lover or family (without magical
intervention). I would love to see some proof, IN THE TEXT, for this
reading.

Brian Willis

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