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Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: May ::
Re: Accents (Received Pronunciation)
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1219  Thursday, 2 May 2002

[1]     From:   Robin Hamilton <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 1 May 2002 18:05:29 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1206 Re: Accents (Received Pronunciation)

[2]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 01 May 2002 10:15:06 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1206 Re: Accents (Received Pronunciation)

[3]     From:   Larry Weiss <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 01 May 2002 15:46:37 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1206 Re: Accents (Received Pronunciation)


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <
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Date:           Wednesday, 1 May 2002 18:05:29 +0100
Subject: 13.1206 Re: Accents (Received Pronunciation)
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1206 Re: Accents (Received Pronunciation)

> From:           Jonathan Hope <
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> Not unrelated to musings about RP, you can read Tom Leonard's poem 'Six
> o'clock news', and hear him speak it (if your computer is swanky enough)
> at the following site

And, boy, do I +ever+ know where this is coming from.

There was a strike reported (well, quite a few) in Glasgow in the
sixties.  The 'objective' newscasters spoke RP, the bosses spoke RP, the
workers spoke Glasgow.  Objectivity, anyone?

This was still a hot issue at least as late as the mid-seventies.  James
Kelman's first published-in-Britain short story, "Nice tae be nice" (the
only one of his in strict Glasgow) was almost physically censored.  The
magazine (_Yorick_) which published it had to switch printers.

(Well, I was censored in the same issue, so it might not all be down to
Jim.)

Robin Hamilton

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Wednesday, 01 May 2002 10:15:06 -0700
Subject: 13.1206 Re: Accents (Received Pronunciation)
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1206 Re: Accents (Received Pronunciation)

Dear all,

You clearly know more about this than I do, so I'll ask a question:
Does anyone know of any examples of members of the upper classes finding
RP odd, or the accents of BBC newsreaders, if they aren't actually
synonymous?

The larger question has to do with how national standards can be treated
as 'other' by people from all regions whatsoever.  If I'm right, then
any national standard would sound upper-class if one thinks of both the
upper class and alternative accents as "not us" or "not from around
here".  Could the alterity of a different class and an alternative
accent just have been conflated at some point by those who neither speak
RP nor are members of the upper classes?  Could RP speakers be assumed
to be upper class in the same way that all non-American English speakers
are sometimes assumed to be British?

Cheers,
Se

 

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