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Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: May ::
Re: Movies and Luhrmann
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1293  Monday, 13 May 2002

[1]     From:   Sam Small <
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        Date:   Friday, 10 May 2002 17:32:59 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1283 Re: Movies and Luhrmann

[2]     From:   Janet Costa <
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        Date:   Friday, 10 May 2002 12:18:02 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1283 Re: Movies and Luhrmann


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sam Small <
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Date:           Friday, 10 May 2002 17:32:59 +0100
Subject: 13.1283 Re: Movies and Luhrmann
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1283 Re: Movies and Luhrmann

Bill Arnold writes of my post:

>But your application of the definition by your example of the way the
>film ended seems more irritating to me than Luhrmann's film.  They died,
>and that IS tragic.  If the real life actor and actress had actually
>acted out their actual deaths, then there would be no Luhrmann's R&J
>II.  I can't wait for the $equel to $hakespeare's R& J II, Luhrmann'$
>way.

It is amazing to me how many people know better than Shakespeare.  I
have often thought in my adaptations that I could come up with a better
plot point or leave out an obvious ploy etc.  Bill Arnold - and I would
presume Luhmann - would not think of re-writing the "To be or not to be"
soliloquy - nothing could be more arrogant.  But to me Shakespeare's
plots are just as importantly thought out as the poetry.  The poetry of
R&J's deaths go with the plot points - every one, not some.  In fact I
would say that in Shakespeare plot is poetry.  Nothing less.  In short,
trust Shakespeare.

SAM SMALL
http://www.passioninpieces.co.uk

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Janet Costa <
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Date:           Friday, 10 May 2002 12:18:02 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 13.1283 Re: Movies and Luhrmann
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1283 Re: Movies and Luhrmann

Thanks, Gabriel! I had forgotten about good ole Caius, which was first
performed in 1679 and continued to hold the stage until 1744. Although
the play is more political treatise than romance, Lavinia and Marius do
share that theatrical moment, and after Theophilus Cibber's 10
performances, enter Garrick. I stand corrected. I don't believe,
however, that Luhrmann went back to the 17th century. I will check
though.

Janet

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