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Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: May ::
Re: Conspicuous Silence
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1358  Monday, 20 May 2002

[1]     From:   Jan Pick <
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        Date:   Saturday, 18 May 2002 20:22:48 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1343 Re: Conspicuous Silence

[2]     From:   Edward Pixley <
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        Date:   Sunday, 19 May 2002 18:44:49 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1343 Re: Conspicuous Silence


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jan Pick <
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Date:           Saturday, 18 May 2002 20:22:48 +0100
Subject: 13.1343 Re: Conspicuous Silence
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1343 Re: Conspicuous Silence

My favourite is the silence after Volumnia 'persuades' Coriolanus not to
march on Rome!  It does depend somewhat on the nerve of the actor as to
how long it is held, though!

Jan

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Edward Pixley <
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Date:           Sunday, 19 May 2002 18:44:49 -0400
Subject: 13.1343 Re: Conspicuous Silence
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1343 Re: Conspicuous Silence

> From:           Anna Kamaralli <
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> My personal favourite "conspicuous silence" comes right at the end of
> _Measure for Measure_ when the Duke asks Isabella to marry him TWICE and
> she makes no reply.  W.W. Lawrence had "no doubt that she turns to him
> with a heavenly and yielding smile" but some of us may no be so sure...

I always like to think that, during the first proposal, she is so intent
on seeing the living Claudius that she doesn't even notice the Duke's
proposal -- one more instance of his misplaced assumptions about how
people will behave.  Why should he assume that she will be more focused
on her expected gratitude to him than she is on a reconciliation with
the brother whom she has spent most of the play trying to either keep
alive or in a state of grace for sanctified death?  But just as he has
been readjusting to the independent actions of his willful subjects
throughout the play, to make sure the end comes out the way he wants it
to, so here he is forced to propose a second time.  I like to think
that, this time, he makes some physical effort to ensure that she not
only hear but accept his proposal.  He certainly gives her no time to
reject it.

Ed Pixley

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