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Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: May ::
Re: Hamlet Texts
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1394  Wednesday, 23 May 2002

[1]     From:   Mike Jensen <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 22 May 2002 08:09:33 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1380 Re: Hamlet Texts

[2]     From:   Steve Roth <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 22 May 2002 07:37:24 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1368 Re: Hamlet Texts

[3]     From:   Clifford Stetner <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 22 May 2002 14:35:11 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1380 Re: Hamlet Texts

[4]     From:   Takashi Kozuka <
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        Date:   Thursday, 23 May 2002 13:30:51 +0100 (BST)
        Subj:   Re: Hamlet Texts


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mike Jensen <
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Date:           Wednesday, 22 May 2002 08:09:33 -0700
Subject: 13.1380 Re: Hamlet Texts
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1380 Re: Hamlet Texts

Himadri Chatterjee may wish to be aware of two publications by Bernice
W. Kliman, hero of the recent *New Yorker* article.

Paul Bertram and Bernice W. Kliman, eds.
The Three-Text Hamlet: Parallel Texts of the First and Second Quartos
and
First Folio
New York: AMS Press. 1991

This prints all three side-by-side for comparison.

Bernice W. Kliman, ed.
The Enfolded Hamlet
Shakespeare Newsletter Extra Issue, 1996

This elegantly uses parenthesis and brackets to put all three texts on
the same line, yet tells you which parts belong to which text.  Bernice
has generously put this on-line, where you will find a fuller
explanation.
http://www.global-language.com/enfolded.intro.html

Mike Jensen

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steve Roth <
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Date:           Wednesday, 22 May 2002 07:37:24 -0700
Subject: 13.1368 Re: Hamlet Texts
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1368 Re: Hamlet Texts

My letter to the New Yorker re: Rosenbaum's article, revised a bit for
SHAKSPEReans:

The confusion that arises from Hamlet's three texts "acts out" and
epitomizes that very oh-so-modern uncertainty of knowledge that has made
Hamlet the central text of the Humanist religion. That uncertainty rings
from the opening line--"Who's there?"--to the Folio Hamlet's final
silence-denying "O"s. It's amusing to think that the author "intended"
all that textual confusion.
If he did, the two-volume, three-text Arden can be for nothing but the
good. But I have to wonder who it's for. I own many or most of the
editions--conflated and otherwise--starting with Furness' Variorum, and
go through most of them regularly. I have a web site on the darn play,
and am just polishing off a book on it. This just to say that I'm sort
of at the center of the target market for the new Arden Hamlet. And I
don 't think I'd buy it (though I would covet Anne Barton's notes). It's
just too unwieldy compared to what's already available and forthcoming.

Transcriptions of all the quarto and folio texts are available on the
web for the taking and the searching, albeit largely unedited
(uvic.ca/shakespeare). Add Furness's Variorum, Bernice Kliman's Enfolded
Hamlet in print and online (alas, not including the Q1 variations), her
wonderful Three-Text Hamlet, and the upcoming MLA Variorum under her
supervision (kudos also to Clary, Rasmussen, and Aasand), and I'm at a
loss as to why Arden would supercede Jenkins (May flights of angels sing
thee to thy rest). Another printed transcription, when printed
transcriptions are already widely available?

Why not, instead, a licensed reprint of AMS Press's paltry printing of
the Three Text Hamlet, with Arden's imprimatur (and Barton's notes?)?
AMS has been promising to put it back in print, but "while the grass
grows..." [the steed starves.] (While we're at it, someone should
publish Lear in the same format.)

With all that currently available, the value of new Hamlet editions lies
expressly in the editing (and the notes, etc.), so we don't have to
enfold the play ourselves. I had the pleasure to hear the Oxford
Shakespeare co-editor Stanley Wells comment affably from the back of the
room at a 2001 conference, "If you don't like the way I edited it, do it
yourself!" Thanks, but even I am quite happy to have the likes of
Stanley Wells, Horace Howard Furness, David Bevington, or Harold Jenkins
spend twenty-eight years doing it for me.

Thanks,
Steve
http://princehamlet.com

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Clifford Stetner <
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Date:           Wednesday, 22 May 2002 14:35:11 -0400
Subject: 13.1380 Re: Hamlet Texts
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1380 Re: Hamlet Texts

Shakespeare. The three-text Hamlet : parallel texts of the first and
second quartos and first folio / edited by Paul Bertram and Bernice W.
Kliman. 1991

A very wide book

Clifford

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Takashi Kozuka <
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Date:           Thursday, 23 May 2002 13:30:51 +0100 (BST)
Subject:        Re: Hamlet Texts

Londoners can buy the New Yorker at Borders in Charing Cross Road. (The
bookshop had more than 20 copies last Saturday.) SHAKSPEReans in other
major cities should be able to find it in big bookshops. Although the
article lacks the journalist's own analysis of the texts (probably
because it was not his purpose) and does not thoroughly 'examine'
various editors' views (because it would not be appropriate for an
article in a non-academic magazine), it well 'reports' them, and it is
clear who says what for what reasons. (It also reports Anne Thompson's
age.) Needless to say, the New Yorker is pricy in the UK (

 

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