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Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: May ::
Re: Stratford: To Act or Not to Act
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1420  Tuesday, 28 May 2002

[1]     From:   Sam Small <
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        Date:   Friday, 24 May 2002 13:36:09 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1407 Re: Stratford: To Act or Not to Act

[2]     From:   Nancy Charlton <
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        Date:   Friday, 24 May 2002 09:05:54 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1407 Re: Stratford: To Act or Not to Act

[3]     From:   Matthew Baynham <
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        Date:   Monday, 27 May 2002 09:24:49 +0100
        Subj:   Threppence


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sam Small <
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Date:           Friday, 24 May 2002 13:36:09 +0100
Subject: 13.1407 Re: Stratford: To Act or Not to Act
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1407 Re: Stratford: To Act or Not to Act

I don't know from which part of England H. David Friedberg hails but his
phonetic interpretation of English accent seems to be a little remiss.
He says "3d, by the way is pronounced thrippence."  I always heard it as
"thruppence."  Elsewhere he states "If he were to meet Queen Elizabeth
II he would find the preferred form of address is Ma'am, pronounced as
'Marm.'" The upper classes, as well as a good slice of the middle class,
have a clear impediment that prevents them from sounding "R"s in most
cases.  "Car" is pronounced "Cah" and "park" becomes "pah-k" and so on.
So the aforementioned "Ma'am" would be pronounced open mouthed rather
like a goldfish opening and closing its jaws.  This is one of the
reasons English middle class actors sound so awful speaking Shakespeare.

SAM SMALL
http://www.passioninpieces.co.uk

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nancy Charlton <
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Date:           Friday, 24 May 2002 09:05:54 -0700
Subject: 13.1407 Re: Stratford: To Act or Not to Act
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1407 Re: Stratford: To Act or Not to Act

David Friedberg wrote:

>I miss the old familiar names for common coins. Bob, tanners, florins.
>3d, by the way is pronounced thrippence, 2d is tuppence, 1.5d is three
>hapence, and 1/6 is eighteenpence
>
>Now it follows easily haha 5/- is five bob and also 25p

How could anyone miss it, even us Yanks?

Thanks for this, and also to Sophie Masson and Peter Holland for this
clarification. Now I'll know the price of the Mad Hatter's hat next time
I read Alice.

>I do not have the glyph for pound on the keyboard, but it looks like a
>fancy ELL.  It's still in use, at least until it all goes Euro
>
>David

I popped up Character Map and did an informal query. Most of the older
Windows type fonts have the pound sign but not the Euro, but the MS
fonts and a few other newer ones have the Euro symbol also. To inscribe
them, have NumLock on, hold down Alt and press on the number pad (won't
work on the top row):

Alt + 0163 = 

 

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