2002

Shakespeare Duck

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1438  Tuesday, 28 May 2002

From:           Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 25 May 2002 20:11:13 -0700
Subject:        Shakespeare Duck

One of the most ghastly objects I have ever seen was just sent to me by
a fan of mine.  (I know it was a fan, because that is how the anonymous
note was signed.)

It is a Shakespeare rubber duck.  Yes, a rubber duck that is suitable
for floating in the tub when you take a bath.  It has the basic rubber
duck body shape, but in faux-Elizabethan clothing, and I guess it
resembles Shakespeare--if Shakespeare had a beak.

If anyone has the bad taste to want this thing, please let me know
off-list.

My apology if my *fan* is a member of SHAKSPER.  This isn't a rejection
of your good wishes, only of having too much kitschy clutter in my life.

All the best,
Mike Jensen

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Master Slender

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1437  Tuesday, 28 May 2002

From:           Rainbow Saari <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 26 May 2002 11:29:48 +1200
Subject:        Master Slender

The Merry Wives of Windsor contains a great many inconsistencies,
perhaps best explained as the result of the author's  haste in
constructing the play. One oddity that I have not found any editorial
comment on occurs at the beginning of 4.1(in the Folio text; Q 1 omits
the scene). Mistress Page, accompanied by Mistress Quickly, is taking
her young son William to school when they encounter Sir Hugh Evans, the
Welsh parson.

M. Page;    ...I'll but bring my young man here to school: looke where
his
Master comes; 'tis a playing day I see: how now Sir Hugh, no School to
day?

Evans;        No: Master Slender is let the Boys leave to play.

M. Quickly;   'Blessing of his heart.

M. Page;      Sir Hugh, my husband says my son profits nothing in the
world at his Book: I pray you ask him some questions in his Accidence.

Evans;    Come hither William; hold up your head; come.

M. Page;  Come on sirra; hold up your head; answer your Master, be not
afraid.

Evans proceeds to grill William on his Latin (with inappropriate
comments interposed by Mistress Quickly). One assumes that the parson,
Hugh Evans, is in fact the boys' teacher. Or is it just that Mistress
Page, knowing the parson knows Latin, is asking him to verify that a
nameless schoolteacher is doing a good job?

What baffles me most is this; how is it that Master Slender, who is
supposedly visiting Windsor with his Cousin Master Robert Shallow
Esquire and who has 'lingered about a match' to Anne Page, has any
jurisdiction over the students?

Can anyone shed any light on why Slender gets mentioned here?

Thanks,
Rainbow Saari

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

The Spirit of Bowdler Lives!

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1435  Tuesday, 28 May 2002

From:           John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 25 May 2002 15:10:51 +0100
Subject:        The Spirit of Bowdler Lives!

Late at night ideas tend to merge into one another, so I fell to musing
about the recent spat over film adaptations of Shakespeare, Richard
Burt's obsession with so-called adult movies, and Sam Small's with age
restrictions.  I started wondering about age restrictions (US and UK)
for various recent adaptations (with older comparisons).  These are the
results (usually DVD, otherwise VHS):

Hamlet (Branagh): US PG-13, UK PG
Henry V (Branagh): US PG-13, UK PG
Richard III (McKellen): US R, UK 15
Titus (dir. Taymor): US R, UK 18
Romeo & Juliet (DiCaprio): US PG-13, UK 12
Romeo & Juliet (dir. Zeffirelli): US PG, UK PG
Tempest (dir. Jarman): US R, UK 15

What is going on here? R-rated Shakespeare?  Have the censors taken
leave of their senses?  Titus Andronicus I could perhaps understand
(though not forgive), but Richard III and The Tempest?  Perhaps some
adaptations do have artistic validity after all!  Otherwise, the censors
seem to agree with Sam Small: Kids, if offered Shakespeare, Just Say No.

John Briggs

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Non-Shakespearian Drama Database

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1436  Tuesday, 28 May 2002

From:           Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 25 May 2002 17:12:58 +0100
Subject:        Non-Shakespearian Drama Database

NON-SHAKESPEARIAN DRAMA DATABASE

There are 711 items listed in Chadwyck-Healey's Literature Online (LION)
database as extant 'drama' first performed between 1567 and 1642. The
Non-Shakespearian Drama Database (NSDD) is a free searchable index of
these 711 items built using data from LION and Alfred Harbage's Annals
of English Drama.

Version 2.5 of NSDD is now available at:

www.totus.org/nsdd

The main improvement over version 2.0 (announced last month) is that
NSDD now includes all 711 items listed in LION, so this means, for
example, that all the Jonson masks and entertainments, and all the
Middleton civic pageants are there. There is a new field attached to
each record, 'additional information', which records departures from
LION and Harbage, as for example where LION and Harbage have been
overruled by arguments in Wells and Taylor _William Shakespeare: A
Textual Companion_ (Oxford, 1987). (Although the NSDD is intended to
promote the non-Shakespearian work, Shakespeare is now included for the
sake of completeness and comparison.)

Version 3.0, in progress, will include for each work a link to the
full-text of the play script in LION. Under present agreements with
Chadwyck-Healey this link will work only for users accessing NSDD from
within a domain registered to a LION-subscribing institution.

Gabriel Egan

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: AVN Story on Hotel O

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1434  Tuesday, 28 May 2002

From:           Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 25 May 2002 12:46:18 +0100
Subject: 13.1414 AVN Story on Hotel O
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1414 AVN Story on Hotel O

In the past Richard Burt has promoted porn films as a subject of
academic study on this list, and I've been unpopular for arguing that
this is politically objectionable.

The standard argument against my position has been based on Burt's right
to free speech, and it has been alleged (by Burt and others) that I must
be a puritanical stuffed shirt to think that this industry harms the
women involved in its productions and demeans women generally.

My purpose in making this posting is to put on record (specifically, the
SHAKSPER archive) the fact that Burt has now promoted on this list a
film in which he participated by writing the screenplay and casting the
actors (see posting SHK 13.1414  Friday, 24 May 2002).  This shows, as
if it needed demonstrating, that Burt is not an objective cultural
critic reporting on the phenomenon of Shakespeare-related porn, but is
himself part of this pernicious industry.

The owner of the porn-production company for which Burt did this work
claims that its "interracial and ethnic products" are well known. You'd
think from this terminology that the films were progressively
multicultural, but actually this is a sanitizing gloss to obscure the
real interests served. The porn-production company's website, however,
assumes that its readers know what these neutral-sounding words really
denote. A typical example film promoted on the website is "Once You Go
Black #45 - Ebony Blow Job Babes", described as "4 Afro Bangin' Hours!
Starring: Miscellaneous Ho's!" [Emphasis as in the original.]

Gabriel Egan

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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