2002

Re: Shakespeare and Marlowe

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.2487  Tuesday, 31 December 2002

[1]     From:   Claude Caspar <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 30 Dec 2002 10:16:46 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.2470 Frontline does Marlowe

[2]     From:   Russell MacKenzie Fehr <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 30 Dec 2002 10:34:28 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.2476 Shakespeare and Marlowe

[3]     From:   Edmund Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 30 Dec 2002 12:35:46 -0500
        Subj:   Shakespeare and Marlowe

[4]     From:   Peter Groves <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 30 Dec 2002 22:57:30 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.2476 Shakespeare and Marlowe


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Claude Caspar <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 30 Dec 2002 10:16:46 -0500
Subject: 13.2470 Frontline does Marlowe
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.2470 Frontline does Marlowe

I see (here in Washington, DC) that PBS' Frontline is having a show on
"Much Ado About Something"- Marlowe as possible author of you know what.
Should be worth seeing, though I am surprised this dog still hunts.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Russell MacKenzie Fehr <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 30 Dec 2002 10:34:28 EST
Subject: 13.2476 Shakespeare and Marlowe
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.2476 Shakespeare and Marlowe

Odds are, this is going to be someone who lives in this mother's
basement claiming that he (for some reason there tend not to be too many
notable anti-Stratfordian women) has evidence that Marlowe wasn't really
murdered. The chief problem with this can be summed up with two
questions "Who was murdered, then, instead of Marlowe?" and "Why doesn't
Marlowe's name ever come up again?". And, to respond to answers I'm
already hearing "No, it couldn't have been Shakespeare, the painting we
have of Marlowe and the engraving of "young Shakespeare" in the First
Folio look nothing like each other", and, "Even if someone who knew him
didn't say "Saw Marlowe, though he's been calling himself Shakespeare
lately", certainly the Court (and for the theories to work, he'd have to
still be employed as a spy, otherwise, the Court wouldn't have protected
him) would have mentioned him in some document by name".

While I've been hyperbolic, the people who say that Marlowe wrote
Shakespeare's works tend to have, on average, even worse arguements than
those who claim Oxford wrote them.

Russell MacKenzie Fehr

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Edmund Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 30 Dec 2002 12:35:46 -0500
Subject:        Shakespeare and Marlowe

Dear Bill:

Frontline is usually well researched, thorough, and reliable, in my
experience. But if the title of this program's next piece is "Much Ado
about Something," I fear that this excellent series has dropped the
ball. If only the writers had used the real title of Shakespeare's play!

Best,
Ed Taft

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Groves <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 30 Dec 2002 22:57:30 +0000
Subject: 13.2476 Shakespeare and Marlowe
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.2476 Shakespeare and Marlowe

>SHAKSPEReans might like to know that supposedly on an upcoming PBS
>FRONTLINE show "Much Ado About Something" is to be broadcast next
>Thursday evening, 2 January--in the Washington DC area, maybe
>nationally.

I can recommend the film as an undemanding diversion if you're
interested in a comparative presentation of British and American
eccentricity (dottiness vs. loopiness).

Peter Groves

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Re: Online Articles

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.2486  Tuesday, 31 December 2002

From:           Thomas Larque <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 30 Dec 2002 13:31:24 -0000
Subject: 13.2477 Online Articles Related to Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.2477 Online Articles Related to Shakespeare

>This is the first paragraph of a rather rambling article. Interesting,
>though, that the Pentagon should think of Shakespeare among others
>to improve soldiers' minds as they go to war.

Does it say in the article which Shakespeare is being used?  I suspect
this could backfire if the plays are read in the wrong (from the US
military's point of view) spirit.

Did they send Hamlet musing about Fortinbras killing off his soldiers to
win barren and useless land for the sake of honour?  Or Henry V ordering
the murder of French prisoners of war?  Or Falstaff picking the worst
possible soldiers as cannon fodder, in order to extort bribe money from
the better soldiers who did not want to go?  Or Coriolanus invading his
own homeland? Perhaps eager soldiers read Shakespeare differently from
pacifists, but a lot of what Shakespeare has to say about war doesn't
seem particularly encouraging.

It would be interesting to know which Shakespeare text the American army
thinks is suitably pro-war to encourage those who will likely be
invading Iraq very soon.  Are they that confident that their soldiers
will not know of, or fail to notice, the anti-war readings of
Shakespeare that are now predominant?  Reading Shakespeare as pro-war
patriotic propaganda seems very old fashioned judging by most modern
theatre productions that I have seen.

Thomas Larque.

"Shakespeare and His Critics"
http://shakespearean.org.uk

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
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Re: Hamlet, CEO

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.2484  Tuesday, 31 December 2002

[1]     From:   Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 30 Dec 2002 13:43:47 -0500
        Subj:   SHK 13.2472 Hamlet, CEO

[2]     From:   Ruth Ross <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 30 Dec 2002 19:06:46 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 13.2472 Hamlet, CEO

[3]     From:   Robin Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 31 Dec 2002 02:06:26 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.2472 Hamlet, CEO


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 30 Dec 2002 13:43:47 -0500
Subject: Hamlet, CEO
Comment:        SHK 13.2472 Hamlet, CEO

Dear Eric Cohen,

'He is dealing with the ghost of his father, the founder of the firm.
His greatest weakness is his indecisiveness. He is moody and when
slighted, pursues revenge rather than stopping to think rationally.'

Your client is clearly President Bush. Please raise your hands above
your head and step away from the White House.

T. Hawkes

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ruth Ross <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 30 Dec 2002 19:06:46 -0500
Subject: 13.2472 Hamlet, CEO
Comment:        RE: SHK 13.2472 Hamlet, CEO

Eric,

As I recall, Hamlet is about 30 years of age, a perpetual grad student
type at Heidelburg U. One of my professors pointed this out and we
seemed to think it shed some light on his indecisiveness re Claudius and
the ghost. Have you ever discussed how old Hamlet is as the play opens?

Ruth Ross

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 31 Dec 2002 02:06:26 -0000
Subject: 13.2472 Hamlet, CEO
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.2472 Hamlet, CEO

>It would
>help me to read your impressions of what kind of CEO Hamlet might make!

The simple answer to this is that Hamlet would make an awful CEO.

Robin

_______________________________________________________________
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The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
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Re: Cordelia and Listening to the Play

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.2485  Tuesday, 31 December 2002

[1]     From:   Michael Shurgot <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 30 Dec 2002 13:40:54 -0800
        Subj:   RE: SHK 13.2448 Re: Cordelia and Listening to the Play

[2]     From:   Michael Shurgot <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 30 Dec 2002 14:07:19 -0800
        Subj:   RE: SHK 13.2439 Re: Cordelia and Listening to the Play

[3]     From:   Ruth Ross <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 30 Dec 2002 19:09:41 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 13.2468 Re: Cordelia and Listening to the Play


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Shurgot <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 30 Dec 2002 13:40:54 -0800
Subject: 13.2448 Re: Cordelia and Listening to the Play
Comment:        RE: SHK 13.2448 Re: Cordelia and Listening to the Play

Dear Colleagues:

Professor Kamaralli mentions what perhaps happens when the character of
Cressida is examined in performance, rather than when she is "seen" only
on the page. I suggest two essays that examine this very point that
Professor Kamaralli and others may find engaging.

The first is Douglas Sprigg's excellent "Shakespeare's Visual
Stagecraft: The Seduction of Cressida'" in Shakespeare: The Theatrical
Dimension, eds.  McGuuire & Samuelson, AMS, 1979. This essay deserves to
be well known and often discussed. The second, which I mention only to
advance this discussion and whose value others can decide, is my reply
to Sprigg in chapter 7 of my book Stages of Play, where I examine the
character of Cressida in this "seduction" scene as it may have been
staged at The Globe. Sprigg finds Cressida unfaithful and an active
agent in the scene; by posing a different blocking of the scene on the
Globe stage, I find an altogether different interpretation of her
"character" in this scene. I wrote that chapter because I disagreed so
strongly with Sprigg's conclusion, even while I admired his very well
written, theatre-based approach.

Perhaps these essays will engage others and advance our discussion.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Shurgot <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 30 Dec 2002 14:07:19 -0800
Subject: 13.2439 Re: Cordelia and Listening to the Play
Comment:        RE: SHK 13.2439 Re: Cordelia and Listening to the Play

Dear Colleagues:

I wish to clarify one point that Prof. Barton makes against my last post
on Cordelia, etc., and then I shall cut this thread. I never said that
professors had no authority to interpret characters. I only pointed out
that our business as teachers and scholars, especially if we want our
students to appreciate that Shakespeare wrote PLAYS, is to stress that
out work involves what the playwright (any playwright) actually gave us,
and I have found that in teaching undergraduates that is more than
enough work for my students. I have also found that relating some of the
dramatic situations that Shakespeare gives us to some recognizable and
repeated human situations (call them archetypes or something else; the
term does not matter) that students can grasp aids my teaching of and my
students' understanding of Shakespeare enormously.

As for actors, their authority obviously is their training and their
position: they are paid to work with the black marks on the white page
and to create from thence a recognizable and (hopefully) psychologically
consistent and understandable interpretation of a character.

My very best wishes for a PEACEFUL New Year! God bless us, everyone.

-Michael

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ruth Ross <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 30 Dec 2002 19:09:41 -0500
Subject: 13.2468 Re: Cordelia and Listening to the Play
Comment:        RE: SHK 13.2468 Re: Cordelia and Listening to the Play

Ted,

I agree wholeheartedly with you. According to Louise Rosenblatt's reader
response theory of literary strategy, reading (or in the case of a play,
seeing) is actually a transaction between the author and the audience.
In a performance, that might mean close to 1000 people, each with
his/her own way of receiving and decoding what's going on up on the
stage. This becomes even more problematic when the author is dead for
centuries!

Ruth Ross

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Courses of Study and Universities

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.2483  Tuesday, 31 December 2002

From:           Jodie Neller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 30 Dec 2002 09:01:31 EST
Subject:        Courses of Study and Universities

Dear Group,

I would appreciate any information regarding which universities offer
Master Degrees (Research) where I can focus my work on the historical
context of William Shakespeare.

I am in Australia, however I am more than willing to travel anywhere in
the world to do further study.

So Hardy is not worked over-time on my request, any information can be
e-mail directly to me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Thank you in anticipation,
Jodie Neller

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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