Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: December ::
Re: "details such as this"
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.2449  Friday, 20 December 2002

[1]     From:   Phyllis Rackin <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 19 Dec 2002 09:41:21 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.2438 Re: "details such as this"

[2]     From:   Nora Kreimer <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 19 Dec 2002 07:15:11 -0300
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.2432 "details such as this"

[3]     From:   John V. Knapp <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 19 Dec 2002 15:34:47 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Response to Re: SHK 13.2438 Re: "details such as this"


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Phyllis Rackin <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 19 Dec 2002 09:41:21 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 13.2438 Re: "details such as this"
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.2438 Re: "details such as this"

There's a good history of what was done to feed infants when breast milk
was not available in Valerie Fildes's book, Breasts Bottles and Babies:
A History of Infant Feeding (Edinburgh University Press, 1986)

Phyllis Rackin

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nora Kreimer <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 19 Dec 2002 07:15:11 -0300
Subject: 13.2432 "details such as this"
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.2432 "details such as this"

One shouldn't forget Prospero's voyage carrying a baby and all his books
on a frail boat, and no nursing women to take care of three-year old
Miranda...O wonder!

Regards
Nora Kreimer

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John V. Knapp <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 19 Dec 2002 15:34:47 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Re: SHK 13.2438 Re: "details such as this"
Comment:        Response to Re: SHK 13.2438 Re: "details such as this"

Folks --

Setting aside the sense that not all texts require mimetically realistic
details to evoke powerful aesthetic responses, one might look at Steven
Ozment's *Flesh and Spirit: Private Life in Early Modern Germany*
(Viking, 1999) for some interesting analogies to these Qs.  Ozment says
that for
certain parents of infants,

"beer and wine ... became a supplement to breast milk at least as early
as four months.  Once an infant had safely passed the vulnerable first
months of life in good health, the parents evidently believed that the
alternation of human milk with bovine milk, beer, and/or wine was the
best way to provide it safe and plentiful nourishment, while advancing
it steadily toward weaning at age one" (89).

For infant feeding earlier than four months, perhaps an unnamed (because
so obvious) wet-nurse was the source of infant food?  Or, perhaps
Shakespeare just plain didn't think of these mimetic details within the
context of *The Winter's Tale,* etc., as Prof. Kennedy says,
"[e]ssentially, because it had nothing to do with the plot."

Cheers,
John V. Knapp

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.