Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: December ::
Re: Cordelia and Listening to the Play
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.2485  Tuesday, 31 December 2002

[1]     From:   Michael Shurgot <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 30 Dec 2002 13:40:54 -0800
        Subj:   RE: SHK 13.2448 Re: Cordelia and Listening to the Play

[2]     From:   Michael Shurgot <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 30 Dec 2002 14:07:19 -0800
        Subj:   RE: SHK 13.2439 Re: Cordelia and Listening to the Play

[3]     From:   Ruth Ross <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 30 Dec 2002 19:09:41 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 13.2468 Re: Cordelia and Listening to the Play


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Shurgot <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 30 Dec 2002 13:40:54 -0800
Subject: 13.2448 Re: Cordelia and Listening to the Play
Comment:        RE: SHK 13.2448 Re: Cordelia and Listening to the Play

Dear Colleagues:

Professor Kamaralli mentions what perhaps happens when the character of
Cressida is examined in performance, rather than when she is "seen" only
on the page. I suggest two essays that examine this very point that
Professor Kamaralli and others may find engaging.

The first is Douglas Sprigg's excellent "Shakespeare's Visual
Stagecraft: The Seduction of Cressida'" in Shakespeare: The Theatrical
Dimension, eds.  McGuuire & Samuelson, AMS, 1979. This essay deserves to
be well known and often discussed. The second, which I mention only to
advance this discussion and whose value others can decide, is my reply
to Sprigg in chapter 7 of my book Stages of Play, where I examine the
character of Cressida in this "seduction" scene as it may have been
staged at The Globe. Sprigg finds Cressida unfaithful and an active
agent in the scene; by posing a different blocking of the scene on the
Globe stage, I find an altogether different interpretation of her
"character" in this scene. I wrote that chapter because I disagreed so
strongly with Sprigg's conclusion, even while I admired his very well
written, theatre-based approach.

Perhaps these essays will engage others and advance our discussion.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Shurgot <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 30 Dec 2002 14:07:19 -0800
Subject: 13.2439 Re: Cordelia and Listening to the Play
Comment:        RE: SHK 13.2439 Re: Cordelia and Listening to the Play

Dear Colleagues:

I wish to clarify one point that Prof. Barton makes against my last post
on Cordelia, etc., and then I shall cut this thread. I never said that
professors had no authority to interpret characters. I only pointed out
that our business as teachers and scholars, especially if we want our
students to appreciate that Shakespeare wrote PLAYS, is to stress that
out work involves what the playwright (any playwright) actually gave us,
and I have found that in teaching undergraduates that is more than
enough work for my students. I have also found that relating some of the
dramatic situations that Shakespeare gives us to some recognizable and
repeated human situations (call them archetypes or something else; the
term does not matter) that students can grasp aids my teaching of and my
students' understanding of Shakespeare enormously.

As for actors, their authority obviously is their training and their
position: they are paid to work with the black marks on the white page
and to create from thence a recognizable and (hopefully) psychologically
consistent and understandable interpretation of a character.

My very best wishes for a PEACEFUL New Year! God bless us, everyone.

-Michael

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ruth Ross <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 30 Dec 2002 19:09:41 -0500
Subject: 13.2468 Re: Cordelia and Listening to the Play
Comment:        RE: SHK 13.2468 Re: Cordelia and Listening to the Play

Ted,

I agree wholeheartedly with you. According to Louise Rosenblatt's reader
response theory of literary strategy, reading (or in the case of a play,
seeing) is actually a transaction between the author and the audience.
In a performance, that might mean close to 1000 people, each with
his/her own way of receiving and decoding what's going on up on the
stage. This becomes even more problematic when the author is dead for
centuries!

Ruth Ross

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.