2002

Re: Hamlet! The Musical

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.2390  Tuesday, 10 December 2002

[1]     From:   Todd Pettigrew <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 9 Dec 2002 10:05:42 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.2385 Re: Hamlet! The Musical

[2]     From:   Bob Haas <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 09 Dec 2002 11:00:50 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.2385 Re: Hamlet! The Musical


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Todd Pettigrew <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 9 Dec 2002 10:05:42 -0400
Subject: 13.2385 Re: Hamlet! The Musical
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.2385 Re: Hamlet! The Musical

Kristine Batey raises a question that has always intrigued me.  Why
hasn't Disney done Shakespeare?

It occurs to me that The Tempest has exactly the kind of plot that
Disney loves. A young woman on a far away island falls in love with a
mysterious stranger and ends up sailing off into the sunset with him.
One can almost here Miranda's opening song:

There must be more than this island's shores
I know there has to be.
Across the sea,
There's a brave new world
That's waiting there for me!

Throw in a powerful magician, hilarious drunken servants, a nefarious
plot against a King by his no-good brother and the no-good brother's
no-good friend (who also happens to be the no-good brother of the
magician!) and how could Disney pass it up? All that, and a monster and
a fairy to boot!

Could it be that Disney will only adapt stories when they have to
radically alter them?  Or is Shakespeare too sacred even for Walt and Co
to plunder?

t.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bob Haas <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 09 Dec 2002 11:00:50 -0500
Subject: 13.2385 Re: Hamlet! The Musical
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.2385 Re: Hamlet! The Musical

I vote for a talking herring.  (He walks on his flippers.)

>Claudius. With the help of his
>best friend Horatio--not a human being, but a small, wisecracking Danish
>animal of some sort--a hedgehog? a trained seal?--Hamlet gets the goods
>on Polonius, outwits the hapless Rosencrantz and Guildenstern (who don't
>get killed, just go through some comical humiliation involving pies,
>troughs full of water, horse dung, and humorously striped long
>underwear), and rescues Ophelia, who isn't dead, just locked up in a
>tower.

Bob Haas
Department of English
High Point University

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How Main Words Did Shakespeare Invent?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.2389  Tuesday, 10 December 2002

From:           Stuart Hampton-reeves <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 09 Dec 2002 14:04:14 +0000
Subject:        How Main Words Did Shakespeare Invent?

I am intrigued by the statistic from the BBC (quoted by Al Margery in
his recent post on the Great Britons series) which credits Shakespeare
with inventing no less than 1700 words. I've heard similar claims
before, of course, and I've often wondered how true they are. I also
spent some time recently trying to track down (with no success)
Shakespeare's use of the phrase 'but me no buts' for a linguistics
colleague who had found numerous references to it as Shakespeare's
invention on the internet.

Stuart Hampton-Reeves

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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
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Sorry Will, and Liz too, but Winnie and Di Top You

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.2387  Monday, 9 December 2002

From:           Al Magary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Fri, 6 Dec 2002 23:56:42 -0800
Subject:        Sorry Will, and Liz too, but Winnie and Di Top You

[Editor's Note: This is a once only message. I will not post responses
to it. 


Re: First English Translation of Montaigne's Essays

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.2388  Tuesday, 10 December 2002

From:           Ted Nellen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 9 Dec 2002 07:25:06 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 13.2384 Re: First English Translation of Montaigne's
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.2384 Re: First English Translation of Montaigne's
Essays

I, too, have wondered this connection. I found Montaigne's essay "On
Liars" and Touchstone's presentation on the "lie" a very interesting
comparison. Upon further readings on Montaigne and Shakespeare I kept
finding connections. Made me wonder, too.

Ted Nellen

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Richard II on TV

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.2386  Monday, 9 December 2002

From:           Nancy Charlton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 09 Dec 2002 02:49:50 -0800
Subject:        Richard II on TV

You may be interested to know that Ovation, the arts network cable TV
channel, is going to air a controversial production of Richard II.
Friday, December 27, 4 p.m. EST, will be the next showing. Here is the
blurb on the web site:

>Richard II, as directed by Deborah Warner, drew critical acclaim
>throughout Europe. Her controversial casting of actress Fiona Shaw in
>the title role defines this production of Shakespeare's classic as a
>milestone in the world of theatre. Specially reworked for the best
>possible television experience, this unique modern production captures
>the power and brilliance of classical theatre.

This will be my third Richard II for the year!

Nancy Charlton

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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