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Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: November ::
Re: Taming of the Shrew Film
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.2208  Wednesday, 6 November 2002

[1]     From:   R. Schmeeckle <
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 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 5 Nov 2002 08:05:22 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.2184 Re: Taming of the Shrew Film

[2]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 05 Nov 2002 13:24:10 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.2197 Re: Taming of the Shrew Film

[3]     From:   Claude Caspar <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 5 Nov 2002 22:37:16 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.2197 Re: Taming of the Shrew Film


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           R. Schmeeckle <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 5 Nov 2002 08:05:22 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 13.2184 Re: Taming of the Shrew Film
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.2184 Re: Taming of the Shrew Film

Ruth Ross <
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 > writes,

>I say, whatever it takes to get kids to enjoy Shakespeare, USE IT! Get
>out of the ivory tower. BTW, try linking "Hamlet" with "Home Alone."
>Both are revenge plays. Sure makes "Hamlet" accessible to non-readers.

I used to introduce King Lear to high school seniors by referring to it
as being about generational conflict.  Then I would say, with an ironic
tone, that, of course, THEIR parents would never act unjustly.  They
perked up.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 05 Nov 2002 13:24:10 -0400
Subject: 13.2197 Re: Taming of the Shrew Film
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.2197 Re: Taming of the Shrew Film

Jim Slager asks,

>Why could
>Shakespeare's audience sitting in uncomfortable wooden seats or even
>standing in the heat or cold endure the entire play?  It would seen that
>Shakespeare, over his long career, must have carefully tailored his
>plays to suit his audience.  Why have audiences changed so much?

No doubt you'll get the usual responses about modern man as a
channel-surfing cretin.  There is, however, also the possibility that
Shakespeare's plays were considerably shorter in production than in the
folio texts, or that parts were added and removed depending on the
audience.

Cheers,
Sean Lawrence.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Claude Caspar <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 5 Nov 2002 22:37:16 -0500
Subject: 13.2197 Re: Taming of the Shrew Film
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.2197 Re: Taming of the Shrew Film

>>Was I the only child who ever lived, to say, "Although this art form
>>seems peculiar to me now, credible adults clearly think much of it, and
>>therefore I shall pay attention to it as best I can, trusting that, with
>>maturity, I shall appreciate it more?"
>
>I think you were the only child who ever said that.

Well, I feel like I am being "outed."  I said that, more or less, at
eight, soon after attempting suicide.  And, have lived my life
accordingly, for this applies to all of experience.  I realized, a
willingness to believe as a sort of gamble, that there were values out
there that I was not yet ready to appreciate, and that it would be worth
the effort to attune myself to them- in other words that Beauty & Truth
existed- later, much later, I found Love.  My rubric has been to seek
out teachers/teachings and open up to them.  Finding a map, the
navigational tools, and mastering them, always heading true north.

There seems in "This strange disease of modern Life." [M Arnold] an
inability in the West, especially here in US, to appreciate hierarchy.
Just one example: When Karl Haas told me (I was 12) that Mozart's 40th
Symphony was one of the most beautiful works in all of music I ran out
to buy it, to discover Beauty- I found it inaccessible to my horror.
Then realized that I was not yet worthy, able to experience, and began
to expose myself more and more, trusting Haas knew and that I would
evolve.  Why him?  That is the magic.  We are judged by our judgments,
and learning how to detect counterfeit gold whilst not loosing faith in
discovering rare real gold, is a grace & knack.  I have been blessed in
having teachers who have pointed me in the right direction, like Philip
Rodman who inspired me to learn the Sonnets by heart, as he did. I
retired 20 years ago, at 30, to, simply put, evolve in every way I
could.

"All things excellent are as difficult as they are rare."

"Discipline is for the sake of freedom."

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