2002

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.2224  Friday, 8 November 2002

[1]     From:   Bob Rosen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 7 Nov 2002 10:38:13 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.2215 Re: Taming of the Shrew Film

[2]     From:   Martin Steward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 7 Nov 2002 18:50:40 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.2215 Re: Taming of the Shrew Film


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bob Rosen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 7 Nov 2002 10:38:13 EST
Subject: 13.2215 Re: Taming of the Shrew Film
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.2215 Re: Taming of the Shrew Film

>I find Mozart's
>music spiritless, clever-clever, computer-esque, soulless, two
>dimensional, repetitive and tuneless.  Why?  I have no idea and I have
>no intention of finding out.  I think Rembrandt was a genius above all
>others but find Picasso a bore.  JS Bach's music always thrills me,
>whereas Jazz leaves me stone cold.  I love the Sex Pistols but find The
>Clash tiresome.  God only knows why and I don't think he's about to tell
>me.

There's no ultimate definition of taste. I'm sure there are folks around
who detest Shakespeare. There are very intelligent folks who can't run a
computer. That doesn't mean that Shakespeare or the computer should be
discounted or devalued. To say Mozart's music is spiritless,
clever-clever, computer-esque, soulless, two dimensional, repetitive and
tuneless is an act of intellectual vandalism. That's like setting fire
to a great library because you hate books. It's enough to say that you
don't dig Mozart personally for reasons you keep to yourself, thereby
permitting others to decide about Mozart for themselves without being
influenced by a partisan opinion.

The skies are painted with unnumber'd sparks.... and you're not the only
one who holds on his place.

As for reviewing Shakespearean productions, I've never come away from
even an interpretation I felt was inappropriate without offering
positive advice. I'm sure Mozart is all ears.

When you have the time, please take in a good performance of Don
Giovanni. You might reconsider your initial estimation of Wolfgang
Amadeus. Give genius a chance.

BR

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Steward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 7 Nov 2002 18:50:40 -0000
Subject: 13.2215 Re: Taming of the Shrew Film
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.2215 Re: Taming of the Shrew Film

"Shakespeare would have emigrated [to America]", writes Sam Small, as if
he could never have had the opportunity in his lifetime. The early
seventeenth century, of course, saw emigration from England to North
America on a fairly grand scale by Protestant "separatists", driven to a
large extent by an "irreverence for hierarchy" (both social and
ecclesiastical), and by the notion that "America could be the spiritual
centre of the earth because of her rejection of traditional cultural
tyranny". Shakespeare, it is safe to assume, was not one of them.

Apart from that, however, I thought Sam's post was eloquent and
insightful and humane.

m

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