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Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: November ::
Re: Pop Assorted
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.2336  Monday, 25 November 2002

[1]     From:   David Evett <
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        Date:   Sunday, 24 Nov 2002 23:20:30 -0500
        Subj:   Shakespeare in Shiprock

[2]     From:   Dave Kathman <
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        Date:   Sunday, 24 Nov 2002 22:56:47 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.2326 Re: Pop Shakespeares Assorted

[3]     From:   Graham Hal<
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        Date:   Monday, 25 Nov 2002 11:14:24 +0000
        Subj:   The Crying Game


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <
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Date:           Sunday, 24 Nov 2002 23:20:30 -0500
Subject:        Shakespeare in Shiprock

The climax of the most recent of Tony Hillerman's series of mystery
novels set in the Navaho and Hopi country of Arizona and New Mexico,
*The Wailing Wind*, involves an extended and mostly pretty apt
connection with *Othello*.

David Evett

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dave Kathman
 <
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Date:           Sunday, 24 Nov 2002 22:56:47 -0600
Subject: 13.2326 Re: Pop Shakespeares Assorted
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.2326 Re: Pop Shakespeares Assorted

Sherri Fillingham wrote:

>I'm new to the list, and thus new to the conversation, but I just read
>Harry Turtledove's latest book "Ruled Britannia" which features William
>Shakespeare as the protagonist.
>
>For those who aren't familiar with Turtledove's work, he does
>alternative histories, usually focusing on the U.S.  This book, however,
>shifts his focus and is set in an England that fell to the Spanish
>Armada.  Thus, Protestant Elizabeth is in the Tower and the Spanish
>Inquisition has a branch in England.  Both sides of the struggle turn to
>the apolitical Shakespeare to write a play for their cause as Phillip II
>is about to die.
>
>While I never felt Shakespeare himself was in danger (which lessens much
>of the tension of the book), it still possesses Turtledove's detailed
>research and is a very interesting read.

I just got this book and have not yet finished reading it, but I'm
enjoying it quite a bit.  Lope de Vega is also a major character, living
in London and hanging around the Theatre as a spy for the Spanish
overlords.  And Christopher Marlowe is still alive in 1597, when the
novel is set, but is under much suspicion from the Spanish.  The
monarchs are Queen Isabella, daughter of Philip II of Spain, and her
husband Albert of Austria; Robert Parsons is Archbishop of Canterbury
(ha!); and Charles Neville (in reality a Catholic exile on the
Continent) is Earl of Westmoreland, Protector of the English
Inquisition, and patron of Shakespeare's company, "Lord Westmoreland's
Men".  The period detail is very accurate, typically for Turtledove, who
has a Ph.D in history.  And the speech of Shakespeare is peppered with
quotes from Shakespeare's plays, much as in *Shakespeare In Love*.  I'm
a bit of a sucker for books like this, since I've liked alternate
histories forever, but even having only read a fraction of the book,
I'll join Sherri Fillingham in recommending it.

Dave Kathman

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[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Graham Hal<
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Date:           Monday, 25 Nov 2002 11:14:24 +0000
Subject:        The Crying Game

John Zuill asks "Anyone remember The Crying Game? Anyone care?"

Yes to both.

It's considered a classic by the few buffs, such as myself, who were
intoxicated by Pirate Radio Caroline (and other substances) in the
summer of  '64 and are still alive to recall these things.

Most of us returned our MBE's to HM the Q when it failed to get beyond
no.5 in the charts; that's how much we care. Dave Berry is still making
a living singing it. (Saw him some months ago) So he's been at his
business as long as Will was at his. Berry's modus operandi was to
perform while hidden by a prop. This is a practice that many modern
actors at Stratford could well emulate.

But perhaps I am confused as to the thrust of Mr Zuill's question.

Peace, man

Graham Hall

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