Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: October ::
Re: Passion in Pieces
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.2012  Wednesday, 2 October 2002

[1]     From:   Jadwiga Krupski <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Saturday, 28 Sep 2002 11:47:22 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1945 Re: Passion in Pieces

[2]     From:   John Velz <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Saturday, 28 Sep 2002 22:56:21 -0500
        Subj:   Passion in Pieces


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jadwiga Krupski <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Saturday, 28 Sep 2002 11:47:22 -0400
Subject: 13.1945 Re: Passion in Pieces
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1945 Re: Passion in Pieces

Thanks a million, Brian Willis! I have rarely read such a comprehensive
and informative presentation. I shall now listen to actors delivering
Shakespeare's lines with a different ear! Jadwiga Krupski

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Velz <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Saturday, 28 Sep 2002 22:56:21 -0500
Subject:        Passion in Pieces

D. Bloom SHK 13.1987 says that many actors are not sure what they are
saying, only that it is poetical and lovely.  True, sad to say.

My little experience directing and acting in Sh. taught me that I could
as a literary critic or a teacher of lit. say of passage x in Sh. that I
think it could mean this or maybe that.  But as an actor I could not get
away with that wishy washy paralysis of the will.  If the actor does not
"know" exactly what he thinks it means, he conveys virtually nothing to
the audience.  So in line rehearsals with individual actors they were
always encouraged to ask about what they were actually saying in line
356, if they had any doubt at all.  If they thought it might mean x as
well as y, I urged them to settle firmly on either x or y, unless the
actor was a seasoned veteran who likely could convey both meanings to a
single audience at once.

It seems likely that the supposed obscurity of Shakespeare for modern
audiences is the Bloom view that often the actor is only mouthing words
not mouthing ideas.  According to the principle above, the audience gets
nothing out of some lines because the actor does not understand them
him/herself.

Cheers,
jwv

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.