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Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: October ::
Re: Haunted by the Ghost in Hamlet
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.2040  Wednesday, 9 October 2002

[1]     From:   Claude Caspar <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 8 Oct 2002 10:56:00 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.2034 Re: Haunted by the Ghost in Hamlet

[2]     From:   John Zuill <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 08 Oct 2002 13:35:43 -0300
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.2034 Re: Haunted by the Ghost in Hamlet

[3]     From:   Clifford Stetner <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 8 Oct 2002 23:28:43 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.2034 Re: Haunted by the Ghost in Hamlet


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Claude Caspar <
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Date:           Tuesday, 8 Oct 2002 10:56:00 -0400
Subject: 13.2034 Re: Haunted by the Ghost in Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.2034 Re: Haunted by the Ghost in Hamlet

John W. Kennedy <
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 > responds to David Bishop
<
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 >:

>>Shakespeare's ghost may
>>contribute as much to folk belief as it takes from it.
>
>Dorothy L. Sayers says as much, as I recall, in her introduction to the
>"Purgatorio".  But note that Shakespeare is only reflecting the
>Purgatory of his age; Dante's mountain of faith, of hope, and of love,
>of Paradise deferred, but not denied, is quite alien to the Hell annexe
>found even in the most liberal 16th-century RCism.

Careful, lest you be tried for treason, Bloom bases his whole Aesthetic
on this principle...

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Zuill <
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Date:           Tuesday, 08 Oct 2002 13:35:43 -0300
Subject: 13.2034 Re: Haunted by the Ghost in Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.2034 Re: Haunted by the Ghost in Hamlet

The issue of the Ghost and the quick asides to Religion bring up
something that has always seemed peculiar to me. God, as a power, does
not get much of a role in Shakespeare. For such a broad writer God
(correct me if I am wrong) is never evoked for aid, prayed to on stage
(Claudius doesn't count) and only once is there a reference to what God
might think (Somewhere in the Henrys when York gets his head taken off
by Margaret).  One of the wonderful things about Isabel in M for M is
that she believes in God but gets on with life on her own initiative.
Other gods do appear but rarely ( I am thinking of Hymen in As You Like
It and Hecate in Macbeth if you count it). I am no scholar of
Shakespeare in historical context or the history of religion but
Shakespeare seems sort of like an Elizabethan deist and the conversation
about organized Christianity doesn't seem appropriate.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Clifford Stetner <
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Date:           Tuesday, 8 Oct 2002 23:28:43 -0400
Subject: 13.2034 Re: Haunted by the Ghost in Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.2034 Re: Haunted by the Ghost in Hamlet

I recall reading somewhere that "that same star" is a reference to a
meteor that appeared around the time of Hamlet's production. If so,
yesterday's event in Colorado seems like the same phenomenon. Is it
possible that the ghost is in part merely a literary symbol for an
uncanny experience shared by a number of night watchers (the School of
Night)?

http://www.denverpost.com/cda/article/print/0%2C1674%2C36%257E53%257E910080%
2C00.html

Tuesday, October 08, 2002 - For the second night in a row - and at
almost the exact same time - people across Colorado state saw a
streaking fireball shoot across the sky early Monday night.
....
Robert Stencel, a professor of astronomy at the University of Denver,
said two similar events on consecutive nights was not necessarily
unusual, especially for this time of year.
....
"If one large chunk flies by, it's possible that smaller pieces are
traveling in similar orbits," Stencel said. "There might be a modest
armada of boulders around it."
....
While the appearance of such prominent fireballs two nights in a row is
interesting, Stencel said, it is not an extraordinary event. "It's
probably a 1 or 2 on a scale of 10," he said.

Clifford Stetner
CUNY
http://phoenixandturtle.net

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