2002

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.2131  Friday, 25 October 2002

[1]     From:   Frank Whigham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 24 Oct 2002 10:10:28 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.2128 Re: More about "Julius Caesar"

[2]     From:   Roger Schmeeckle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 24 Oct 2002 09:08:57 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.2128 Re: More about "Julius Caesar"


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Frank Whigham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 24 Oct 2002 10:10:28 -0500
Subject: 13.2128 Re: More about "Julius Caesar"
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.2128 Re: More about "Julius Caesar"

>Are there any parallels in Caesar with Elizabeth (clearly approaching
>the end of her reign in 1598-99) and the Essex Rebellion?

FYI, cf. Rebhorn, Wayne A. "The Crisis of the Aristocracy in Julius
Caesar." Renaissance Quarterly. 43(1):75-111. 1990 Spring.

Frank Whigham

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roger Schmeeckle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 24 Oct 2002 09:08:57 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 13.2128 Re: More about "Julius Caesar"
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.2128 Re: More about "Julius Caesar"

Brian Willis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> writes,

>is Cassius playing upon Casca's superstition and Brutus's honor to win
>them into the conspiracy, or Shakespeare's use of Antony to make us
>believe Brutus is (not) an "honorable" man only to declare him the
>noblest Roman of them all at the end of the play.

It has long been my personal interpretation that the final lines were
meant sarcastically, the implication that none of the Romans were very
noble.  The "noblest" was an assassin of his benefactor and patron.  I
am curious whether others have so interpreted the play.

I noticed in Norton that there is a controversial line about Caesar,
"Caesar never does wrong, except by just cause," the last four lines
omitted in the Folio, but presumably spoken by the actors, since Jonson
so quoted them.  That contradiction would emphasize a critical attitude
towards Caesar as intended.

      Roger Schmeeckle

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