2002

Re: "Blackboard"- Enhanced Course

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1898  Friday, 13 September 2002

[1]     From:   Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 13 Sep 2002 13:35:09 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1867 "Blackboard"- Enhanced Course

[2]     From:   Michael Best <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 13 Sep 2002 13:39:20 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1887 Re: "Blackboard"- Enhanced Course


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 13 Sep 2002 13:35:09 +0100
Subject: 13.1867 "Blackboard"- Enhanced Course
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1867 "Blackboard"- Enhanced Course

Edna Z. Boris writes,

>What I would like guidance on is how best to use the discussion board
>feature.  Does anyone have any experience with that?  What kinds of
>rules facilitate discussion?  What kinds of questions work well in such
>a medium?

In the United Kingdom, the English Subject Centre is currently running a
travelling C&IT roadshow. One recent event at University of
Wolverhampton was on use of Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs), of
which Blackboard is an example, and one of the sessions was aimed at
developing guidelines for use of discussion boards for student learning.
The participants agreed to follow up their deliberations with an online
discussion leading to a collaborative document on this subject.  Anyone
can join this discussion by pointing their web-browser at the English
Subject Centre's part of the Learning and Teaching Support Network:

http://www.english.ltsn.ac.uk/

and then choosing the link for 'Discussion', going directly to the
'Message Board', registering with the discussion group, then go to 'All
Forums', and choose the one on 'Using Discussion Boards'.

The English Subject Centre's discussion forum would also be a good place
for those with strong reservations about the use of VLEs (like me) to
air them.

Gabriel Egan

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Best <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 13 Sep 2002 13:39:20 -0700
Subject: 13.1887 Re: "Blackboard"- Enhanced Course
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1887 Re: "Blackboard"- Enhanced Course

I've not used Blackboard, or its Canadian equivalent, WebCT, in the
virtual classroom, but I do find that electronic discussion of one kind
or another can add interest and a kind of equity to both virtual and
normal classes. I now use a "Web Board" both for my online class and a
large lecture class. In each case, I find that more students are willing
to contribute, and that the discussion tends to be more thoughtful than
in class -- no doubt because students have more time to think things
through. The software doesn't require constant evaluation of the
discussion, and in fact I encourage students to write informally.

Michael Best
Coordinating Editor, Internet Shakespeare Editions
<http://www.uvic.ca/shakespeare>

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S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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Re: T&C Textual Question

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1897  Friday, 13 September 2002

From:           Chris Stroffolino <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 12 Sep 2002 15:31:31 -0700
Subject: 13.1884 Re: T&C Textual Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1884 Re: T&C Textual Question

Thanks for these responses....

chris

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Bushmen Don't Understand Hamlet

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1895  Friday, 13 September 2002

From:           Al Magary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 12 Sep 2002 12:30:34 -0700
Subject:        Bushmen Don't Understand Hamlet

On the AnSax list, a U.S. Forest Service archaeologist, Walter
Kingsborough, contributed this anecdote to a thread about humor in
different cultures.  (Relayed by Al Magary)

-----
I apologize for stepping in without references, however I can add to
this thread that trans-cultural humor, though not my area of emphasis,
is a well established topic in Anthropology.  Many ethnographic sources
are available it you check with your Anthro Dept.  The reference to
Shakespeare puts me in mind of one ethnologist who, after many weeks of
listening to nightly story telling among the San Bushmen of Southwest
Africa, offered to tell a story. His hosts were delighted that he wanted
to participate and so he began to tell them the story of Hamlet.  Not to
recite the play so much as simple tell the story of a King murdered by
his brother, an incestuous marriage, and a troubled nephew torn between
revenge for his father and fear for his own soul.

The San audience failed to grasp even what we would consider to be the
most basic foundation stones of the plot.  Aside from the concepts of
King and Kingdom, they bore total disbelief that a brother would murder
or that an uncle and nephew would ever have such an antagonistic
relationship.  They decided that the ethnologist was pulling their
collective leg and no people would ever act that way.

As to Shakespeare's clowns: not only was humor somewhat different, but
the definition of clown and the clown's role in theatre was also
different (particularly Shakespeare's clowns as he redefined their role
from what had been their standard role up to that time).

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Review of J. Miller's Lear

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1896  Friday, 13 September 2002

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, September 12, 2002 6:50 PM
Subject:        Review of J. Miller's Lear

http://www.nytimes.com/2002/09/12/arts/theater/12LEAR.html
September 12, 2002

Every Inch a King, Every Moment a Revelation

By BEN BRANTLEY

STRATFORD, Ontario, Sept. 7 


Re: C.S. Lewis on Punishment

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1894  Friday, 13 September 2002

[1]     From:   Joachim Martillo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 12 Sep 2002 11:57:57 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1885 Re: C.S. Lewis on Punishment

[2]     From:   Dana Shilling <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 12 Sep 2002 12:26:47 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1885 Re: C.S. Lewis on Punishment

[3]     From:   John W. Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 12 Sep 2002 19:18:34 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1885 Re: C.S. Lewis on Punishment


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joachim Martillo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 12 Sep 2002 11:57:57 EDT
Subject: 13.1885 Re: C.S. Lewis on Punishment
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1885 Re: C.S. Lewis on Punishment

>>1 -- I am puzzled as to the meaning of the phrase, "the terms of the
>>sacrament of Confession." Is he (or she) referring to that sacrament as
>>practiced in the Church of England? If so, could these terms be cited
>>for us -- perhaps in both their modern form (relating to CSL) and their
>>Elizabethan form (WS)?

>From the death of Mary I, at least through Lewis's life, there was no
>such sacrament recognized by the Church of England, although, starting
>in the 19th century, some Anglicans practiced it privately. Official
>notice was taken of it in the Episcopal Church in the USA only in the
>70's, and if it has been introduced in the Church of England (I don't
>know whether it has or not) it has been since then.  Lewis did, in fact,
>have a confessor, but, as he died in 1963, it was never in any
>officially recognized form.

>>What could he possibly do except to "give [him]self up to the
>>police and be hanged"?

>Strictly speaking, of course, Lewis is being obviously rhetorical here.
>In logic, all the penitent murderer can do is give himself up to the
>police; the hanging is out of his hands.

I was under the impression that Anglo-Catholics (sometimes identified as
High Church) have practiced the sacrament of confession since the 19th
century.  Anglo-Catholicism is the name given to the movement within the
Anglican Church that was inspired by the Tractarians.

Death in the Holy Orders is an Adam Dalgliesh mystery that takes place
in an Anglo-Catholic divinity school.

Joachim Martillo

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Shilling <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 12 Sep 2002 12:26:47 -0400
Subject: 13.1885 Re: C.S. Lewis on Punishment
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1885 Re: C.S. Lewis on Punishment

Joining the thread already in progress:

1. Claudius' attempted prayer reminds me of a saying of a Bard somewhat
less exalted than the one that is our topic here:

I've been where you're hanging,
I think I can see where you're pinned.
If you're not feeling holy,
Your loneliness shows where you're sinned.

(Leonard Cohen, "The Sisters of Mercy")

2. And, because we're getting a teensy bit OT, on the subject of guilt
and punishment may I
suggest Auden's "The Guilty Vicarage" (lengthy quotations omitted).

Dana Shilling

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John W. Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 12 Sep 2002 19:18:34 -0400
Subject: 13.1885 Re: C.S. Lewis on Punishment
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1885 Re: C.S. Lewis on Punishment

From:           L. Swilley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

>[The very association of "Christian" with the idea of submission to the
>public police is the telling error.]

    Let every person be subject to the governing authorities. For there
    is no authority except by God's appointment, and the authorities
    that exist have been instituted by God. So the person who resists
    such authority resists the ordinance of God, and those who resist
    will incur judgment (for rulers cause no fear for good conduct but
    for bad). Do you desire not to fear authority? Do good and you will
    receive its commendation, for it is God's servant for your good.
    But if you do wrong, be in fear, for it does not bear the sword
    in vain. It is God's servant to administer retribution on the
    wrongdoer. Therefore it is necessary to be in subjection, not only
    because of the wrath of the authorities but also because of your
    conscience.
         Romans 13:1-5

Look, you can believe whatever you damn well like, but to make
generalized statements about Christian doctrine that are based only on
your private religion is bad scholarship that can only get in the way of
sensible discussion.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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