2002

Re: "Perfect Wagnerite"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1838  Thursday, 5 September 2002

From:           James McNelis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 04 Sep 2002 15:42:17 -0400
Subject:        Re: "Perfect Wagnerite"

The Perfect Wagnerite is by G.B. Shaw, not Oscar Wilde. All best,

James McNelis
Wilmington College OH 45177
members.aol.com/mcnelis

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"Modern dress" Syndrome

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1837  Thursday, 5 September 2002

From:           Martin Steward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 4 Sep 2002 20:16:15 +0100
Subject: "Modern dress" Syndrome
Comment:        SHK 13.1830 "Modern dress" Syndrome

I think I might have said this before on-list:

Shakespeare's plays, like those of his contemporaries, were not really
performed in "period costume", ever. By "period costume", I take it
critics mean "the dress usual amongst the upper classes in England
during Shakespeare's lifetime". But of course, this was not the setting
for most of his drama.

King Lear would have dressed like a Renaissance King, not an Ancient
Briton.  You might have seen the odd toga in a Roman play, but this
would not have been consistent throughout the dramatis personae. Etc.,
etc., etc. Why is it an issue now, if it wasn't then?

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Ethan Hawke Hamlet

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1835  Wednesday, 4 September 2002

From:           Debra Murphy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 3 Sep 2002 14:09:43 -0700
Subject: 13.1817 Ethan Hawke Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1817 Ethan Hawke Hamlet

I must say that exposing my six kids to Shax has been one of the great
pleasures of parenthood.  As for the ability of teens to appreciate his
work, no question this is something that can improve greatly over time
and with life experience, but I'm nonetheless constantly surprised by
the comments and insights my young 'uns bring to the table whenever the
topic is the bard, even when I don't entirely share their views, which
is often the case.

Case in point: my John (aged 19, a college sophomore) has just written
up his take on the Ethan Hawke Hamlet, and I've put it up on
bardolatry.  Can't say I was quite as thrilled about the movie as he
was, but I certainly share his enthusiasm for Kyle MacLachlan's
Claudius. I know John would enjoy hearing from listmembers about his
review, pro or con, if anyone cares to chew the fat with him on this
subject.  Here is the URL: http://www.bardolatry.com/hawkeham.htm John's
e-mail:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Debra Murphy
http://www.bardolatry.com
http://www.debramurphy.com

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Re: Non-Shakespearean Videos

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1836  Thursday, 5 September 2002

[1]     From:   Scott Oldenburg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 04 Sep 2002 13:52:52 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1832 Re: Non-Shakespearean Videos

[2]     From:   Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 04 Sep 2002 14:48:17 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1832 Re: Non-Shakespearean Videos

[3]     From:   Jay Johnson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 04 Sep 2002 13:17:34 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1832 Re: Non-Shakespearean Videos


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Oldenburg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 04 Sep 2002 13:52:52 -0400
Subject: 13.1832 Re: Non-Shakespearean Videos
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1832 Re: Non-Shakespearean Videos

>Re the Cox _Revenger's Tragedy_: I believe there is a website for that
>film.  A colleague directed me to it about a year ago.  I lost the
>bookmark in a computer crash, but the site should still be up.

The Revenger's Tragedy website has a straightforward enough URL:
http://www.revengerstragedy.com

Best,
Scott Oldenburg

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 04 Sep 2002 14:48:17 -0700
Subject: 13.1832 Re: Non-Shakespearean Videos
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1832 Re: Non-Shakespearean Videos

Try http://www.alexcox.com/   Click on the *Revenger's Tragedy* link.

Best,
Mike Jensen

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jay Johnson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 04 Sep 2002 13:17:34 -0600
Subject: 13.1832 Re: Non-Shakespearean Videos
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1832 Re: Non-Shakespearean Videos

The url for the Cox_Revengers Tragedy_ is
http://id.mind.net/~extang/rt/rtindex.html

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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: The Transfer of 'copy rights' in the Stationers

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1834  Wednesday, 4 September 2002

From:           Brian Willis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 3 Sep 2002 11:40:07 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Re: The Transfer of 'copy rights' in the Stationers' Register.

>I was wondering whether anyone could broaden my
>knowledge on the
>practice of the transfer of publishing rights to
>'play bookes' in the
>Stationers' Register from the 1590s and onwards. How
>often is a playbook
>published/printed by the initial authority listed in
>the SR, and how
>often do rights get transferred onto other
>printer/publishers.  I know
>the well-respected printer Roberts is a case in hand
>with the
>Chamberlain's/King's Men. I believe he initially
>entered Hamlet, but Q1
>was published by Simmes for Ling and Trundell.

I'm not sure if rights were transferred or stolen (stol'n and
surreptitious copies), but Roberts did indeed publish Q2 of Hamlet. Did
he authorize Q1?  Probably not, since Q2 proclaims itself a correction
of a previously erroneous edition.

I thought that once someone entered a play in the Stationer's Register
that they had the right to do whatever they wanted print-wise with the
play. If someone wanted to print the play, they had to approach the
person with the rights. Of course, this didn't stop people from trying.
Are there any recorded cases of prosecution of violated rights?

Again, Blayney's article in Cox and Kastan is useful (as is the entire
volume itself), as is Gary Taylor's comprehensive overview in the
Introduction to the Oxford Textual Companion.

Brian Willis

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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