2002

Mysterious and Foreign in Early Modern England

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1795  Monday, 26 August 2002

From:           Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 22 Aug 2002 16:22:09 -0400
Subject:        Mysterious and Foreign in Early Modern England

Mysterious and Foreign in Early Modern England  (04/10/02 - 05/10/02)

This announcement is a reminder of an upcoming conference entitled "The
Mysterious and the Foreign in Early Modern England," October 4th and 5th
2002, hosted by McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Featuring keynote speaker Patricia Parker (Stanford), this two-day
conference offers an exciting and stimulating range of papers related to
the conference theme.  We invite anyone interested in attending the
conference to visit our website at

http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/%7Etaylor/index.html

for more information regarding registration (form available online),
accommodation, conference participants, and a preliminary program of
scheduled events.

Please forward this message to anyone who might be interested in
attending the conference.  All are welcome!

Helen Ostovich
Editor, EARLY THEATRE / Professor, Dept of English
McMaster University
http://www.earlytheatre.ca

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Don Foster on Cipro

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1794  Monday, 26 August 2002

From:           Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 19 Aug 2002 23:07:52 -0400
Subject:        Don Foster on Cipro

Foster's analysis of the anthrax letters is subject to similar criticism
as his poetic attribution: he doesn't seem to consider that the letters
could have been designed to lead to his conclusions (isn't the device of
using Hatfill's African alma mater as a return address a little silly,
whoever did it).  Like Rosenberg, he also doesn't seem to consider that
the composer(s) of the letters might be separate parties from the
anthrax chemist (i.e. he supports the lone nut authorship theory).

Clifford Stetner
CUNY
http://phoenixandturtle.net

>From BBC:

*Anthrax killer 'is US defence insider'*
<http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/em/fr/-/2/hi/americas/2196008.stm>

An FBI language expert says the US anthrax attacks which killed five
were probably the work of a bio-defence insider fired by misplaced
patriotism.

An FBI forensic linguistics expert believes the US anthrax attacks were
carried out by a senior scientist from within America's
biological-defence community.

Professor Don Foster - who helped convict Unabomber Ted Kaczynski and
unveiled Joe Klein as the author of the novel Primary Colors - says the
evidence points to someone with high-ranking military and intelligence
connections.

Speaking about the investigation for the first time, Prof Foster told
the BBC he had identified two suspects who had both worked for the CIA,
the US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID)
and other classified military operations.

Controversially, Prof Foster says the killer is likely to be highly
patriotic individual who wanted to demonstrate that the US was badly
prepared for an act of biological terrorism.

The weapons-grade anthrax was posted in letters just days after the 11
September terror attacks, leaving five people dead, 18 injured and
35,000 forced to take precautionary antibiotics.

The professor says he does not believe the killer will strike again as
he has achieved his goal.

He explained: "To that end his misplaced patriotism has worked. Today
millions of government dollars have gone into research and anthrax
antibiotics are now available to the public."

Agency rivalry?

However, he fears the investigation is now being hampered in its
gathering of vital documents that could lead to the killer.

Prof Foster says investigators need examples of the suspects writing to
analyse their style and use of language - which the professor believes
is as unique as DNA and could unveil the perpetrator.

He said: "It's very frustrating. Ordinarily with the FBI if there's some
documents needed - known writings - boom, they're on my desk the next
day.

"My two suspects both appear to have CIA connections. These two
agencies, the CIA and the FBI, are sometimes seen as rivals.

"My anxiety is that the FBI agents assigned to this case are not getting
full and complete co-operation from the US military, CIA and witnesses
who might have information about this case."

Killer 'diverting suspicion'

Prof Foster was given four letters recovered by investigators to analyse
for clues to the killer's identity.

"As I worked through these documents it became apparent that USAMRIID
was ultimately the best place for the FBI to begin looking for a
suspect," he said.

All of the letters contain the following messages "Death to America" and
"Death to Israel". All were dated 11 September, a clear reference to the
terror attacks.

But while investigators searched for links between the anthrax attacks
and al-Qaeda, Prof Foster immediately suspected that dating the letters
11 September was merely a ruse to throw the authorities off the scent.

He says: "When an offender gives you some piece of information that's
just completely unnecessary and that, in this case, is inaccurate, it
becomes immediately suspect.

"It becomes a statement of 'Here's what I want you to believe about this
document'."

Prof Foster also says the killer seems to have tried implicating two
former USAMRIID scientists who had left the laboratory in unhappy
circumstances by posting the letters from near their homes in New
Jersey.

He says only someone in contact with a senior insider at USAMRIID would
have known how the two scientists left the lab and that they would then
be likely targets for the FBI investigation.

He says: "They are looking at someone who's a little bit higher up the
food chain, who would have to have access to personnel information."

Deliberate mistakes

The professor also identified a number of mistakes and misspellings in
the letters which he suspects are a deliberate ploy to confuse
investigators.

The author of the anthrax letters tells his victims to take penicillin.
Not only is penicillin the wrong antibiotic to take, the killer also
misspells the word.

Prof Foster says: "You mean to tell me this guy is dealing with anthrax,
a trillion spores a gram, and he thinks penicillin is going to be the
antibiotic of choice?

"There's something very fishy about that misspelling there, that this
particular word should be misspelled and it should be misspelled in such
an unconvincing way.

"It looks like an attempt on the offender to say 'Hey, don't think I'm a
scientist, don't think I know anything about antibiotics'."

The FBI have placed a number of scientists under intense scrutiny and
recently questioned US scientist Dr Steven Hatfill in connection with
the attacks.

Dr Hatfill strenuously denies any involvement in the attacks saying: "I
have never worked with anthrax; I know nothing about this matter."

The FBI's investigation continues.

The Hunt for the Anthrax Killer will be broadcast on BBC Two on Sunday
18 August 2002 at 2100 BST

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Popular Culture

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1792  Monday, 26 August 2002

[1]     From:   Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, August 14, 2002 2:23 PM
        Subj:   Lifetime Movie with MND

[2]     From:   Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 19 Aug 2002 04:59:16 -0400
        Subj:   Shakespeare in Unpopular Culture

[3]     From:   Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.net>
        Date:   Sunday, August 18, 2002 7:38 PM
        Subj:   The Bard of Avon is Teaching Corporate Leaders Their Business


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, August 14, 2002 2:23 PM
Subject:        Lifetime Movie with MND

In a typically bizarre Lifetime movie called Someone to Love that aired
Sunday August 11, a character played by the guy who played Noel on
Felicity rapes his girlfriend after she sends too much time rehearsing
for A Midsummer Night's Dream.   Signs for the production are shown as
is the curtain call, but none of the play is actually cited (during the
last hour, at least--I missed the beginning).  There is no apparent
connection between the plot of the film (date rape, a missing father
figure) and the play.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 19 Aug 2002 04:59:16 -0400
Subject:        Shakespeare in Unpopular Culture

http://www.csmonitor.com/specials/shakespeare/

SHAKESPEARE BEHIND BARS

Sammie Byron, inmate: "The death scene with Othello and Desdemona was
almost a reenactment of the crime I committed."

An amazing project.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.net>
Date:           Sunday, August 18, 2002 7:38 PM
Subject:        The Bard of Avon is Teaching Corporate Leaders Their Business

Once more into the breach, dear CEOs: The Bard of Avon is teaching
corporate leaders their business

http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis/web/vortex/display?slug=shakespeare18&date=20020818

By Misha Berson
Seattle Times theater critic

"Oh for a muse of fire, that would ascend
The brightest heaven of invention!"

VANCOUVER, B.C., The man declaiming the hallowed opening verse of
William Shakespeare's "Henry V" in a theater here recently spoke the
lines cogently, resonantly, with full conviction.

This 40-year-old Englishman, with his tousled black hair and trim beard,
was, after all, Richard Olivier, son of famed actress Joan Plowright and
the most revered Shakespearean actor of the past century, Laurence
Olivier.

But the audience hanging on to his every word was not your standard
matinee-theater crowd. Instead, Olivier was delivering some of the Bard
of Avon's most stirring lines to a group of 50 bank and credit-union
managers and social-service, arts and university administrators, not for
an afternoon's entertainment, but for lessons in organizational
leadership.

And when he intoned, "Once more into the breach, dear friends!" Henry
V's familiar exhortation to his troops during a battle with France,
Olivier reshaped it into a cry to galvanize today's employees to greater
glory.

Should we be surprised by this use of the Bard's words? After all, his
phrases and face have already been stamped on countless consumer items,
from sweat shirts to tote bags, screen savers to coffee mugs. There is
Shakespeare beer, a Shakespeare credit card.

And Richard Olivier is not the first to sell Shakespeare as a management
guru. Such reputable schools as Columbia University offer business
courses based on the Bard's wisdom, and at least a dozen how-to books
expound on the theme, with titles such as "Shakespeare in Charge: The
Bard's Guide to Leading and Succeeding on the Business Stage" and
Olivier's own tome, "Inspirational Leadership: Henry V and the Muse of
Fire."

Such appropriations of history's most esteemed English-language
playwright strike some as crass commercialism.

"I'd default these management books and courses as a dilution, a
dumbing-down of Shakespeare into bite-sized homilies," says Richard
Burt, an English professor at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst,
and editor of  the book "Shakespeare after Mass Media."

"It's very clear from the Enron and WorldCom business scandals that this
aesthetic, virtuous approach to business has little use at all," Burt
argues. "It's certainly no replacement for good government regulations."

Relating plots to modern woes

But Olivier, a trained actor and stage director who has worked full time
as a teacher-consultant for the past several years, cheerfully defends
his "mythodrama" program. He sees no contradiction in prizing
Shakespeare as both a literary genius, and as a guide to enlightened
modern management.

And he has mined the plays' themes aggressively. Serving a "balanced
portfolio" of corporate, government and nonprofit organizations,
Olivier's firm offers courses using "Julius Caesar" (workshop subtitle:
"Emotional and Political Intelligence: How to Avoid Getting Stabbed in
the Back at Work"), "Hamlet" ("Managing the Edge of Chaos: How to Avoid
Going Mad at Work") and "The Tempest" ("The Art of Leading Change: What
to Do When Everyone Feels Shipwrecked") in addition to his "Henry V"
sessions.

Coming soon: a "Macbeth" workshop. And will it relate the wisdom of that
great Scot CEO who murdered his way to the throne, then was toppled in a
bloody coup?

"We teach people about the leadership mistakes in Shakespeare, too,"
quipped Olivier.

Attendees at the B.C. workshop, hosted by Bard on the Beach (Vancouver's
resident Shakespeare theater) clearly shared Olivier's belief that the
Bard could be a meaningful business guide. They paid up to $365 Canadian
for the half-day class with the London-based Olivier. And some paid more
for a post-workshop dinner, and a performance of Bard on the Beach's
staging of "Henry V."

Spicing his lesson with humor and interactive exercises, Olivier broke
Shakespeare's saga of Henry V, a 15th-century British monarch who led
the nation in an uphill victory against France, into a "journey" of plot
points and management dilemmas.

First came Henry's "call to the imagination" and "visioning of the
future" (yes, the vision thing), followed by his troubled "dark night of
the soul" and incognito "walkabout" among troops before the key Battle
of Agincourt. Finally, Henry "achieves the vision" (the outnumbered
Brits won the day with only 25 casualties to France's 10,000) and turns
the "battlefield into a garden" by uniting the two nations.

Olivier often linked young Henry's challenges to the more mundane
problems today's managers face. For instance, apropos of the conspiracy
and criticism Henry had to fend off, Olivier devoted part of the
workshop to dealing with dissension in one's staff ranks, and how to
distinguish among, and deal constructively with, a "traitor," a
"naysayer" and a "critic."

Sprinkling inspirational quotes from Henry Ford, Nelson Mandela and Carl
Jung into his presentation, and referring to color-coded handout charts,
Olivier also outlined four "leadership archetypes," to suggest how
administrators can reach lofty goals by "allocating inner resources"
more effectively.

To demonstrate several types of leadership styles, he had participants
engage in a frisky game of "steal the paper," break into small
problem-solving groups and get to know each other better by lounging on
throw pillows, conversing and munching on chocolates.

An idea comes to fruition

Is this blend of pop psychology, literary analysis and gritty advice a
spiel corporate CEOs and bank directors can buy into? Yes, said Barb
Rosenthal, a manager at B.C.'s Surrey Metro Savings. "It's so rich and
helpful, such great advice," she commented during a break. "And I think
it's the genius of Shakespeare that really brings it alive."

Gaye LePage, a Canadian Food Inspection Agency manager, concurred: "The
theater is a great simile for leadership. What's wonderful about
Shakespeare is how universal his themes and stories are, how much they
apply to so many situations."

Clearly, Olivier's ready charm and family pedigree also helped. He
candidly shared, for instance, the difficulties of being a member of a
famous acting clan and finding his own "France to conquer."

"My siblings and I all tried working in theater," Olivier related in an
interview. "I became a director, and was very involved in getting the
Shakespeare's Globe Theatre built and under way in London. But I became
aware just after my dad's death (in 1989) of my growing interest in
psychology and mythology.

"I started working with (psychologist) James Hillman and (poet) Robert
Bly. And as I met a lot of people who felt very burned out or used up by
the organizations they worked for, I got an inkling of the impact I
could have helping decision-makers do what they do."

But the idea didn't jell for Olivier until 1997, while he was at the
Globe directing "Henry V", a play, incidentally, that his father
triumphed in onstage, then starred in and directed in an Oscar-winning
film version.

With Globe artistic head Mark Rylance, Richard Olivier "got together
some  business leaders and managers in a rehearsal hall, and told them
Henry's story. We focused on his leadership decisions and actions, and
asked what they'd do in his place. Later, these people told us they'd
learned more
from the play than from 10 years of management workshops."

So Olivier Mythodrama Associates was born.

Given the executive-suite scandals at top U.S. firms recently, Olivier
sees more need for the Bard's wisdom than ever.

The Bard's universal reach




Play On/Twelfth Night

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1793  Monday, 26 August 2002

From:           Katy Stavreva <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 19 Aug 2002 16:53:12 -0500
Subject:        Play On/Twelfth Night

Dear SHAKSPEReans,

A couple of years ago, PBS aired Play On, a swing adaptation of Twelfth
Night with songs by Duke Ellington
<http://www.pbs.org/wnet/gperf/shows/playon.html>.  Any ideas as to how
one would be able to get a hold of this musical (strictly for teaching
purposes)?

PBS has not been much help.

Best to all!

Katy

Katy Stavreva
Assistant Professor of English
Cornell College

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Bawds and Bonesetters

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1791  Monday, 26 August 2002

From:           Peter Groves <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 19 Aug 2002 10:28:19 +1000
Subject:        Bawds and Bonesetters

Can anybody recall an Early Modern text in which "bonesetter" is used as
a slang term for a pimp or bawd?  I'm almost certain I came across such
a reference once.  It doesn't appear to be in Shakespeare, nor in either
of the two main Webster tragedies.

Thanks,
Peter Groves
Department of English
Monash University

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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