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Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: July ::
Re: Duke as Count
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1562  Tuesday, 2 July 2002

[1]     From:   P. D. Holland <
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        Date:   Monday, 1 Jul 2002 15:28:38 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1593 Re: Duke as Count

[2]     From:   Jillian Tremblay <
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        Date:   Monday, 01 Jul 2002 11:10:21 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1593 Re: Duke as Count

[3]     From:   Cornelius Novelli <
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        Date:   Monday, 01 Jul 2002 13:06:55 -0400
        Subj:   SHK 13.1593 Re: Duke as Count

[4]     From:   David Bishop <
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        Date:   Monday, 1 Jul 2002 16:56:40 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1593 Re: Duke as Count


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           P. D. Holland <
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Date:           Monday, 1 Jul 2002 15:28:38 +0100
Subject: 13.1593 Re: Duke as Count
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1593 Re: Duke as Count

On the subject of Malvolio's comment. Please note that at this stage all
Malvolio has read of the letter is the address - he has yet to open it.
What he has read - 'To the unknown beloved, this, and my good wishes' -
does not contain the letter c or p (though it does contain u and t).
There therefore has to be a joke in the choice of the letters. Those
whose sensibilities are offended by the idea of a Shakespeare who can
make a dirty joke should (a) explain what the joke is if it isn't dirty
and (b) steer clear of most of Shakespeare's work which is equally full
of what we used to call 'bawdy'.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jillian Tremblay <
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Date:           Monday, 01 Jul 2002 11:10:21 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 13.1593 Re: Duke as Count
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1593 Re: Duke as Count

Concerning any element of "lewdness" Shakespeare may or may not have
intended, I urge you to consult Partridge's "Shakespeare's Bawdy." I
think you will find that his jokes, although peppering a larger context
of satire and wit, are not always as high-brow as some high school
teachers would have them be.

Take Care,
Jillian Tremblay

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Cornelius Novelli <
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Date:           Monday, 01 Jul 2002 13:06:55 -0400
Subject: Re: Duke as Count
Comment:        SHK 13.1593 Re: Duke as Count

It seems to me that Malvolio's C-U-T-P  lines are really an integral
part of the dramatic development in the Box Hedge scene.  The main
thrust of the scene is that Malvolio is a fool, and he's about to become
even more foolish.

Sir Andrew has just scored an unprecedented intellectual triumph,
instantly knowing who the "foolish knight" is.   And Andrew even crows
about it in perhaps the scene's funniest line - - 

 

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