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Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: July ::
Re: British Culture and Shakespeare
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1606  Tuesday, 9 July 2002

[1]     From:   John Drakakis <
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        Date:   Monday, 8 Jul 2002 13:53:07 +0100
        Subj:   RE: SHK 13.1599 Re: British Culture and Shakespeare

[2]     From:   Stevie Gamble <
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        Date:   Monday, 8 Jul 2002 21:26:20 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1599 Re: British Culture and Shakespeare


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Drakakis <
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Date:           Monday, 8 Jul 2002 13:53:07 +0100
Subject: 13.1599 Re: British Culture and Shakespeare
Comment:        RE: SHK 13.1599 Re: British Culture and Shakespeare

I've some sympathy with Richard Burt's reading of the Shakespeare insert
in Last Action Hero, but the joke - and it is a very clever one -
depends upon our knowing that Olivier is a Shakespearean actor noted for
his role as Hamlet, and that Joan Plowright was his wife.  The
expression on her face when she tells her class that they can recognise
Olivier from the Polaroid commercial or as Zeus in The Clash of The
Titans is priceless!

But British dramatists have used Olivier in this way long before
McTiernan.  Trevor Griffiths' play The Party was performed at the
National Theatre with Olivier as the Trotskyite labour leader John Tagg,
and Griffiths has gone on to do this with TV plays e.g. Last Place on
Earth which has Martin Shaw from the TV series The Professionals playing
the role of Scott, who, according to the Huntsford revision was a
bumbling amateur.

The reason I resist a little, the 'post-Shakespeare' reading that
Richard is proposing is that the effect may well depend upon different
audiences.

Cheers,
John Drakakis

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stevie Gamble <
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Date:           Monday, 8 Jul 2002 21:26:20 +0100
Subject: 13.1599 Re: British Culture and Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1599 Re: British Culture and Shakespeare

Perhaps I may borrow this thread title for two recent sightings of one
of the more bizarre manifestations of Shakespeare's influence in British
culture. Liberty's include amongst their bridal silks range a damask
entitled "Othello", and the chain BHS, catering to a rather different
market, entitles one of their bridesmaid designs "Ophelia".  I haven't
the faintest idea why anyone would regard these names as auspicious
omens...

Best wishes
Stevie

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