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Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: July ::
Re: Her C's . . .
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1729  Wednesday, 31 July 2002

[1]     From:   John W. Kennedy <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Jul 2002 18:35:57 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1704 Re: Her C's . . .

[2]     From:   Anna Kamaralli <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 31 Jul 2002 11:27:18 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1704 Re: Her C's . . .


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John W. Kennedy <
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Date:           Tuesday, 30 Jul 2002 18:35:57 -0400
Subject: 13.1704 Re: Her C's . . .
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1704 Re: Her C's . . .

>Good actors not only can but must
>cross generic lines.

I have only just returned from this years' Ohio Light Opera production
of "Der Vetter aus Dingsda", in which the altogether delectable Julie
Wright, best known for her heavy diva roles, from Sylva Varescu to Sari
Lindon, is undertaking a jazzy soubrette, with complete success.

I have seen a single actor (the late Eric Tavares) play Benedick and
Aaron the Moor in rep., both brilliantly.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Anna Kamaralli <
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 >
Date:           Wednesday, 31 Jul 2002 11:27:18 +1000
Subject: 13.1704 Re: Her C's . . .
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1704 Re: Her C's . . .

With regard to various points being made about the ability/adaptability
of actors (the argument over whether someone can successfully do both
and also the comment made that our examples seem to be all male) I have
one response:

Miranda Richardson.

Generally, I think, there are two varieties of actor, the personality
actor and the chameleon actor.  Movie stars tend to fall into the former
category, and people go to see them in order to watch them project
whatever their bread-and-butter persona is.  Most of the chameleons seem
to come out of Bristol Old Vic, which makes me suspect that it's largely
a matter of training.

While I'm busy liberally dishing out poorly substantiated opinions, I
must come down firmly on the side of those arguing that good actors
should be able to do both.  Two reasons - first the point already made
that small companies don't have the luxury of dividing their actors into
comic and tragic, but secondly, I think it's an artificial distinction
anyway.  Most plays include elements of both, and how are the plays of
Tom Stoppard, April de Angelis or Edward Albee, let alone Chekhov, to be
performed without actors who can be both funny and moving?

I'm throwing in Emma Thompson and Judy Davis, too.

Anna.

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