2002

Horse Trading Comedy

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1613  Wednesday, 10 July 2002

From:           Graham Hall <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 09 Jul 2002 15:57:51 +0000
Subject:        Horse Trading Comedy

John Briggs remarks on the Barclays bank advert and its association with
Comedy of Errors and the appearance of (quote) a real centaur (unquote)
therein and not the pub of original intention. Only unicorns are real of
course, but the white centaur is meant to be a dig at Barclays' rival
Lloyds whose logo is a black horse. Or at least, that's my
interpretation.

Best wishes,
Graham Hall.

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editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare in Asian Cinema

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1612  Tuesday, 9 July 2002

From:           Michael B. Luskin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monay, 8 Jul 2002 11:15:16 EDT
Subject:        Shakespeare in Asian Cinema

Perhaps it has already been mentioned, or perhaps I don't quite
understand the criteria for this list of titles, but isn't Kurosawa's
"Throne of Blood" a Japanese Macbeth?  Seems so to me.

The thought of a R & J with Korean versus Japanese families strikes my
funny bone.  No matter what part of the world you're in, there's
somebody to hate.

_______________________________________________________________
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare in the new DNB: "triumphantly

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1609  Tuesday, 9 July 2002

From:           Al Magary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 8 Jul 2002 11:08:56 -0700
Subject:        Shakespeare in the new DNB: "triumphantly international"

SHAKPERians may wish to know what role Shakespeare will have in the vast
New Dictionary of National Biography project, whose title has just been
officially announced as the "Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, in
Association with the British Academy."  In the latest enewsletter
(subscribe at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), editor Brian Harrison writes:

"Big articles still reach me for approval..., last but not least a huge
article on Shakespeare, which carries to the ultimate its discussion on
the ramifications of influence. Half the memoir is devoted to the
after-life, which has as its denouement the worldwide advertising for
cigars which have brand-names such as Hamlet, Romeo y Julietta, Falstaff
and Antonio y Cleopatra. Shakespeare's biography, the history of his
life and his cultural after-lives, the author concludes, 'is not only
national but triumphantly international.'"

The article's author was not mentioned.  On the website--
http://www.oup.co.uk/newdnb/ --I learned that the Shakespeare in the
original DNB (1882-1900) was separately published as book, but the new
one will be 15,000 words or less.

A tidbit on Sir John Fastolf:  "It is important that New DNB's articles
relate their subjects to their popular reputations and how they came to
have them. This comes naturally to contributors when discussing certain
sorts of subjects, for example saints. But the point is much more widely
taken than that. For example, the article on Sir John Fastolf concludes
with his metamorphosis into Shakespeare's Falstaff, and ends with a
mention of Orson Welles's portrayal of him in Chimes at Midnight."  This
was the previous New DNB editor, H.G.C. Matthew, in a 1995 lecture, at
http://www.oup.co.uk/newdnb/html/lslecture.html

And to summarize the vast project, Harrison writes, "With 95% of the
dictionary now captured on our database, we are fast approaching our
target of 50,000 articles in print and online by 2004."

Al Magary

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Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: Identity of W.S.

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1611  Tuesday, 9 July 2002

From:           Bruce Young <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 08 Jul 2002 18:17:35 -0600
Subject: 13.1602 Re: Identity of W.S.
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1602 Re: Identity of W.S.

With the help of Ed Taft's careful analysis as well as suggestions made
by Sean Lawrence, I have read "A Funeral Elegy" with more intense
attention than I had ever planned to.  In fact, I'm surprised at the
intensity of discussion to which we've subjected the poem, given that it
now appears not to be by Shakespeare.  With that in mind, I'll try to
make my comments brief.

As for Ford's religious views (given the evidence that Ford is the
author), I would defer to Gilles Monsarrat, whose article on "A Funeral
Elegy" prompted the recent retractions and reevalutions of the poem.
Monsarrat gives evidence of Ford's essential religious orthodoxy, at
least in his early non-dramatic poetry.

As Ed Taft points out, I don't find Bevington's paraphrase of lines
561ff.  particularly problematic.  The only serious flaw is Bevington's
use of "some indefinable" to modify "hope."  "Some indefinable" does not
paraphrase what the lines actually say but seems to me to awkwardly
express Bevington's difficulty in pinning down what the word "Hope" is
referring to: i.e., "hope--I'm not sure for what, but I think probably
of seeing William Peter after death."

Otherwise, I think it's a decent paraphrase, though "fully" doesn't
entirely capture the implications of "in full possession" and the
paraphrase changes "detain'd" to "deprived."  By making that change--
and also by dropping or modifying the specifically temporal language in
a couple of other lines ("Before it may enjoy" and "the
while")--Bevington obscures the poem's reference to anticipated future
enjoyment.  But he partly makes up for that distortion by adding "now"
("deprived as I now am").

I'm grateful for Ed's summary of standard expectations for an elegy.
Whether Ford failed to meet all of the expectations out of ineptitude or
eccentricity, or to communicate a subtle message, or for some other
reason, I don't know.

Bruce Young

_______________________________________________________________
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Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

The Inter-Cultural Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1610  Tuesday, 9 July 2002

From:           Graham Squires <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 09 Jul 2002 09:54:05 +1000
Subject:        The Inter-Cultural Shakespeare

Our journal INTER-CULTURAL STUDIES will host a one-day seminar on the
theme of the INTER-CULTURAL SHAPESPEARE at the University of Newcastle,
Newcastle, Australia on the 27 of September. We would like to invite
papers that deal with either inter-cultural aspects of Shakespeare's
work or the way in which Shakespeare has been treated in different
cultural traditions. Those interested in participating should submit a
250 abstract by August 30. Our intention is to devote a forthcoming
issue of our journal to this theme. We realise that Australia may be a
long way to come for some people so we would also be happy to consider
papers for inclusion in our journal from people who not able to attend
the seminar in person. For further details contact

Graham Squires
School of Language & Media
University of Newcastle
Callaghan, NSW, 2299
Australia

e-mail:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
website: http://www.newcastle.edu.au/journal/ics/index.html

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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