2002

Cleveland Shakespeare Festival

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1573  Wednesday, 3 July 2002

From:           Tim Perfect <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 2 Jul 2002 08:25:58 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Cleveland Shakespeare Festival

Also to interest to members living or traveling to the Cleveland/Akron
area this summer:

Now in its fifth season, the Cleveland Shakespeare Festival has remained
true to its ideals: spirited - and often irreverent - alfresco
Shakespeare, fast-paced and in contemporary clothing, offered free to
folks stretching out on a lawn before sunset.

Under the artistic leadership of Lawrence Nehring, CSF offers Prince
Hal, Falstaff and their cronies in an omnibus "Henry IV," compressing
both parts into one performance.

It is directed by Nehring and stars Mark Cipra, Mark Ross and Jess
Kamps.

Its second production takes the audience from Parma to the Forest of
Arden in the gender-bending romantic comedy "As You Like It," directed
by Jerrold Scott and starring Cassandra Vincent as Rosalind and Patrick
Jones as Orlando.

Vincent is the Cleveland Shakespeare Festival's first Equity actor, and
all of its actors are from this area.

"Henry IV" runs July 5-7, 18, 20, 26 and 28 and Aug. 1 and 3. "As You
Like It" runs July 12-14, 19, 21, 25 and 27 and Aug. 2 and 4.
Performances are divided between Shaker Heights Colonnade, 3450 Lee
Road, and the Cuyahoga Community College Western Campus, 11000 Pleasant
Valley Road, Parma. All performances begin at 7:00pm and are FREE and
open to the public.
Directions can be found on the CSF website at:

http://www.cleveshakes.org/onstage/directions.html

Call 216-732-3311 for information, email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit
the website: http://www.cleveshakes.org

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: Lear's Map

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1572  Wednesday, 3 July 2002

[1]     From:   Matt Henerson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 2 Jul 2002 17:55:26 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1567 Re: Lear's Map

[2]     From:   Martin Steward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 2 Jul 2002 15:45:40 +0100
        Subj:   SHK 13.1567 Lear's Map


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Matt Henerson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 2 Jul 2002 17:55:26 EDT
Subject: 13.1567 Re: Lear's Map
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1567 Re: Lear's Map

>Several years ago I saw a production in London (I think in 1996) which
>used a huge paper map that was strewn across the stage in 1.1. The paper
>map, itself symbolic, was left on the stage for the whole production, so
>that characters simply walked all over it during the performance.  As
>the kingdom deteriorated, so did the map. The paper map was an
>intriguing and frightening symbolic representation of the fragility of
>power and of sanity.  Really well done. Sorry my memory isn't better on
>the year. Perhaps some colleagues can help with this production.

Adrian Noble's RSC production with Robert Stephens as Lear.  It also
featured a huge globe suspended above the stage which split apart
spilling sand onto the deck just before intermission.  I remember
thinking more of the design than of the performances.

Matt

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Steward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 2 Jul 2002 15:45:40 +0100
Subject: Lear's Map
Comment:        SHK 13.1567 Lear's Map

I think that Michael Shurgot might be remembering the 1993 production
with the late great Sir Robert Stephens in the title role.

Can't believe it's that long ago: remembering the said map, I looked up
Stephens in Dobson & Wells's Oxford Companion and got the date from
there.

m

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare Bulletin Website

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1570  Tuesday, 2 July 2002

From:           Eric Luhrs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 2 Jul 2002 08:14:17 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Shakespeare Bulletin Website

Dear SHAKSPERians,

The Shakespeare Bulletin website currently features the following
full-text articles and reviews from the Spring 2002 issue (20.2):

     "Three Notes on Polonius: Position, Residence, and Name"
     by Bernice W. Kliman

     John Timpane's review of the Philadelphia Shakespeare Festival
     production of King Lear

     Alexander Leggatt's review of the Stratford Festival of Canada
     production of 1 Henry IV and Falstaff (2 (Henry IV)

The following pieces were posted from the Winter 2002 issue (20.1), but
have not previously been announced to SHAKSPER:

    "Choices, Changes, and Challenges: Shakespeare on the Stage in 2001"
     by Allen C. Dessen

     A review of the Royal Shakespeare Company production of 1, 2, and 3
     Henry VI by Patricia Lennox

     "The PBS Othello: A Review Essay"
     by H.R. Coursen

To view these pieces, point your web browser to:

        http://www.shakespeare-bulletin.org

Eric Luhrs

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Dr. Dodypoll

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1571  Tuesday, 2 July 2002

From:           Richard Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 01 Jul 2002 08:32:26 -0700
Subject:        Dr. Dodypoll

If I were to discover a new poem or play by Shakespeare, I'd discover
these few lines and say that Shakespeare wrote them.

"T'was I that led you through the painted meads,
Where the light fairies danced upon the flowers,
Hanging on every leaf an orient pearl,
Which, struck together with the silken wind
Of their loose mantles, made a silver chime.
T'was I that, winding my shrill bugle horn,
Made a gilt palace break out of the hill,
Filled suddenly with troops of knights and dames,
Who danced and revelled; whilst we sweetly slept
Upon a bed of roses, wrapt all in gold."

But that's not Shakespeare. The author of the above is entirely unknown.
But we know that in the Merchant of Venice Shakespeare wrote this:

"Here we will sit, and let the sounds of music creep in our ears.
Soft stillness and the night become the touches of sweet harmony.
Sit, Jessica. Look how the floor of heaven
Is thick inlaid with patens of bright gold.
There's not the smallest orb which thou behold'st
But in his motion like an angel sings,
Still quiring to the young-eyed cherubins:
Such harmony is in immortal souls;
But whilst this muddy vesture of decay
Doth grossly close it in, we cannot hear it."

The above anonymous lines first given are from "The Wisdom of Doctor
Dodypoll", entered Oct 7, 1600, 


Folk Anecdote

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1569  Tuesday, 2 July 2002

From:           Sophie Masson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 2 Jul 2002 20:55:26 +1000
Subject:        Folk Anecdote

As I mentioned in an earlier post, my husband is from rural north-west
Worcestershire, near the little town of Tenbury Wells--actually, his
family's smallholding was in the village of Eastham. In Eastham, there
is a folk anecdote associating Shakespeare with an estate which used to
be there, called Eastham Park. This estate was part of the lands of Sir
Thomas Lucy in the 16th century, and the story goes--of course!--that
this is the 'real' place where WS was supposedly caught poaching. I know
this anecdote is mostly associated with Charlecote, but has anyone else
ever heard it?

Sophie Masson
Author site: http://www.northnet.com.au/~smasson

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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