2002

Scansion - Merry Wives of Windsor

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1693  Wednesday, 24 July 2002

From:           Dave Johnson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 23 Jul 2002 20:33:59 -1000
Subject:        Scansion - Merry Wives of Windsor

I would appreciate a scansion of the following passage from the Merry
Wives of Windsor (Arden Third Series 5.3.37-48).  The Arden edition
suggests that "red" may be inserted after "green" in the first line, and
that then the lines become tetrameter.  With or without that insertion,
I find scansion of these lines very puzzling.

MISTRESS QUICKLY

      Fairies, black, grey, green, and white,
      You moonshine revellers and shades of night,
      You orphan heirs of fixed destiny,
      Attend your office and your quality.
      Crier Hobgoblin, make the fairy oyes.
PISTOL

      Elves, list your names; silence, you airy toys.
      Cricket, to Windsor chimneys shalt thou leap:
      Where fires thou find'st unraked and hearths unswept,
      There pinch the maids as blue as bilberry:
      Our radiant queen hates sluts and sluttery.

FALSTAFF

      They are fairies; he that speaks to them shall die:
      I'll wink and couch: no man their works must eye.

Aloha,
Dave Johnson

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Re: Theatre Outside London

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1692  Wednesday, 24 July 2002

From:           David Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Jul 2002 00:33:24 -0600
Subject: 13.1681 Re: Theatre Outside London
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1681 Re: Theatre Outside London

Hardy wrote:

>[Editor


Re: Double Falshood and I

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1690  Wednesday, 24 July 2002

From:           John W. Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 23 Jul 2002 20:27:23 -0400
Subject: 13.1684 Re: Double Falshood and I
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1684 Re: Double Falshood and I

>A note for the record.
>
>John W. Kennedy posted a very handsome HTML text (and a functional ASCII
>text) of Double Falshood at
>http://pws.prserv.net/jwkennedy/Double%20Falshood.html, and he commented
>briefly on the collated text he has produced for the Sh. community.
>Backing up to his homepage, however, I found a clearer statement of his
>interest in this play:
>
>"Among my interests are...William Shakespeare, the greatest writer who
>ever lived,
>
>--despite the efforts of barking loonies to spread the unfounded rumor
>that he was really someone else, and
>
>--whose lost play Cardenio, despite the claims of yet more barking
>loonies, is partially preserved in Lewis Theobald's Double Falshood; or
>The Distrest Lovers..."

Frankly, my chief interest in the play was that I couldn't find it
on-line, so I decided to do it myself.  While working on it, I have
tried to familiarize myself with the existing scholarship on the subject
of "Cardenio" and "Double Falshood", and I have also studied "The 2nd
Maiden's Tragedy".  I am convinced that the text of "Double Falshood" is
best explained as being truly derived from the lost "Cardenio", for the
usual reasons.  (I have not read Harriet Frazier; her work is not
readily available to me, but, to be frank, the very titles of her
original essays smack to me of obsession.)  I am not aware that any
genuine scholar takes Hamilton's claims seriously; I certainly can't.
The Dramatis Personae made up of Latinate type names and anonymous
descriptions, the lack of setting in place or time, the wholly
unconnected A and B plots, and the unintentionally comic excesses of the
latter would be enough to condemn it without Hamilton's Pelion-upon-Ossa
attempt to make "Double Falshood" a subsequent redaction.

My opinions on the "authorship question" are regularly to be found on
news: humanities.lit.authors.shakespeare.  They have, however, virtually
no bearing on my interest in "Double Falshood", and none at all on my
labors of comma-catching.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Michael Bristol

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1691  Wednesday, 24 July 2002

From:           W.L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 23 Jul 2002 21:35:51 -0400
Subject:        Michael Bristol

I have just finished reading K. K. Ruthven's Faking Literature, wherein
Ruthven misquotes Michael Bristol, and suggests that he -- Bristol -- is
an Oxfordian. I can find no evidence for this suggestion, and I am
wondering if anyone knows of evidence that may support Ruthven's
allegation.

I am reviewing Ruthven's book, so I hope this question is appropriate
for this discussion group.

Thanks.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

A Few Things on All's Well

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1689  Wednesday, 24 July 2002

From:           Michael B. Luskin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 23 Jul 2002 17:57:26 EDT
Subject:        A Few Things on All's Well

I happen to be reading All's Well, and have noticed two uses of words
that make me think of Macbeth.

The word "syllable" is used as it is in Macbeth, "down to the last
syllable of recorded time," by Bertram.  And the word "hereafter" is
used as well, as in "she should have died hereafter."  Coincidence?

A question, what is it in II, iii that turns Lafeu so violently against
Parolles?  The conversation seems prosaic enough, until Lafeu loses his
temper.  Is it in the words, or is it Lafeu's instincts for a low life?

Any coincidence that Dumaine is in this play, which I think might also
have been titled Love's Labours Won, as well as in Love's Labours Lost?

If we think in terms of the fairy tale stood on its head, a usage to
which he violently objects, a fascinating insight, is Bertram's behavior
so unusually bad?  In the last scene, of course, he loses our sympathy
and shows his despicable weakness, but until then he is simply doing
what most soldier nobles would have done.  He would have done better to
observe Parolles and keep his mouth shut, or observe the clown and open
intelligently.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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