Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: June ::
Adaptations and Pop Shakespeare
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1513  Wednesday, 12 June 2002

[1]     From:   Richard Burt <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 6 Jun 2002 11:16:54 -0400
        Subj:   Re: Canadian Adaptations of Shakespeare 2002 Update

[2]     From:   Richard Burt <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Sunday, June 09, 2002 12:07 PM
        Subj:   Madame Tussaud's Shakespeare

[3]     From:   Richard Burt <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Saturday, June 08, 2002 9:13 AM
        Subj:   All Female Production of King Lear

[4]     From:   Richard Burt <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Saturday, June 08, 2002 8:15 AM
        Subj:   Shakespeare on Film and T.V. in Asia and the Asian Diaspora


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 6 Jun 2002 11:16:54 -0400
Subject: 13.1497 Canadian Adaptations of Shakespeare 2002
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1497 Canadian Adaptations of Shakespeare 2002
Update

Of possible interest: The Canadian novelist Leslie Forbes engages The
Tempest in her novel, Bombay Ice.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Sunday, June 09, 2002 12:07 PM
Subject:        Madame Tussaud's Shakespeare

One can buy an icon of Shakespeare from Madame Tussaud's for 9.99 pounds
sterling.

Madame Tussaud's - William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

http://www.collectiques.net/shop/catalogue/icon/tussuad/shakespeare.html

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Saturday, June 08, 2002 9:13 AM
Subject:        All Female Production of King Lear

http://www.calendarlive.com/top/1,1419,L-LATimes-Theater-X!ArticleDetail-62156,00.html

Sunday, June 9, 2002

Spark of the New
Four years in the making, an avant-garde "King Lear" may define the
future of experimental theater in L.A.

By JAN BRESLAUER

More Summer Theater

Young women wearing coveralls take their places in front of a vast white
wall that will, when it comes time for performance, become an
apocalyptic video montage. This may be a theater rehearsal, but
electronics are everywhere: Projectors occupy niches in the wall, cords
thread over the ground like so many Medusa's snakes, and 10 tiny TV
monitors rest on the floor.

Director Travis Preston picks up a handheld microphone and narrates the
sequence of events for his body-miked actors. "Ladies of the army," he
says, speaking to the supporting players, "the audience is coming into
the space." He's referring to the smaller of two cavernous areas in a
mammoth warehouse near downtown L.A.

As they walk to and fro in the long, narrow room, the young women intone
fragments of Shakespeare's text. In performance, they will don masks
bearing the face of Lear.

"Does Lear walk thus, speak thus?"

"So young and so untender?"

"Are you our daughter?"

The chorus forms an undulating line across the length of the room.

"A little lighter on the vocal texture, ladies," says Preston, observing
their movements from a perch midway through the space.

"My wits begin to turn," says a regal voice, cutting through the babble.
The forbidding figure enters, striding through the waves of bodies, who
remain trance-like in her presence. She is
King Lear, by veteran actor Fran Bennett, the longtime Guthrie Theater
player known more recently to L.A. audiences from her outings at South
Coast Repertory, L.A. Women's Shakespeare Company and elsewhere.

Clearly, Bennett is no ordinary Lear. Directed by Preston and staged
environmentally, in six sites in a 30,000-square-foot former power plant
just off the 5 Freeway, this "King Lear" features postmodern aesthetics,
a suspended car wreck and an array of other, similarly outsized effects.
It opens Friday at the Brewery Arts Complex.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Saturday, June 08, 2002 8:15 AM
Subject:        Shakespeare on Film and T.V. in Asia and the Asian Diaspora

I'm writing an Asia on Shakespeare on film and t.v. in Asia and the
Asian disapora, and I have so far found the following films and t.v.
episodes.  Some of the materials are too recent to have been documented
in the major Shakespeare on film reference books.  Some others were
simply missed.

Best,
Richard

P.S. There is also an animated cartoon from Japan called Oh My Goddess:
Midsummer Night's Dream.

the Singaporese comedy a spin-off of Romeo and Juliet, Chicken Rice War
(dir. Chee Kong Cheah, 2000); Gedebe (dir. Nam Ron, forthcoming 2002), a
Malaysian adaptation of Julius Caesar set in Malaysian Mat club and skin
head culture; Shakespeare's collected works in Hong Kong's Hard Boiled
(dir. John Woo, 1992); Akira Kurosawa's Throne of Blood (1957), Ran
(1985), and the Bad Sleep Well (1960); Throne of Flame (Honoo no shiro)
(dir. Kato Tai, 1960), an adaptation of Hamlet; a new digital,
interactive Japanese version of Romeo and Juliet (2000); the Japanese
animated cartoon episode of Ranma 1/2, Anything Goes Martial Arts, Vol.
11: Ranma and Juliet, (dir.  Hideharu Luchi, 1989), a Romeo and Juliet
spin-off also produced in comic book form; a Japanese video game based
on Macbeth entitled Onimusha: Warlords; India's Hamlet (Khoon ka Khoon)
(dir. Sohrab Modi, 1935) and Hamlet (dir. Kishore Sahu, 1954); Indian
Romeo and Juliet spin-offs Romeo and Juliet (dir. Akhtar Hussain, 1947),
Reshma Aur Shera (Reshma and Shera) (dir. Sunil Dutt 1971), Bobby (dir.
Raj Kapoor, 1973), Sholay (dir. Ramesh Sippy, 1975), Romeo in Sikkkim.
(dir. Kaul Karikishen, 1975); Romeo (dir.  S.S. Nair, 1976), Ek Duuje Ke
Liye (Made for Each Other) (dir. K.  Balachander, 1981), Qayamat Se
Qayamat Tak (From Judgment Day to Judgment Day) (dir. Mansoor Khan,
1988), Maine Pyar Kiya (dir. Sooraj R. Barjatya, 1989), Bombay (dir.
Mani Rathnam, 1995), Dil Se (From the Heart) (dir. Mani Rathnam, 1998),
and Mr. Romeo (dir. K.S. Ravi, 1997); a Shakespeare citing hairdresser
in India's Snip! (dir. Sunhil Sippy, 2000); the use of Much ado About
Nothing and Troilus and Cressida in Dil Chahta Hai (The Heart Desires)
(dir. Farhan Akhtar, 2001); a Comedy of Errors spin-off, Angoor (dir.
Sampooran Singh Gulzar, 1982); an Othello spin-off, Kaliyattam (dir.
Jayaraaj Rajasekharan Nair, 1997); a musical romance adaptation of
Antony and Cleopatra set in a Malayalam mileu in which a cockfighter
falls for the local beauty entitled Kannagi (dir. Jayaraaj Rajasekharan
Nair, 2002); Monsoon Wedding (dir. Mira Nair, 2001), structured like a
Shakespeare comedy; Chunhyang (dir. Kwon-taek Im, 2000), often said to
be Korea's Romeo and Juliet; the U.K. The Children's A Midsummer Night's
Dream (dir.  Christine Edzard, 2001) and a made-for-television
production of Henry Purcell's The Fairy Queen (dir. Barrie Gavin, 1995),
with an Indian cast as the changeling boy; Sense and Sensibility (dir.
Ang Lee,1995), with a quotation from Shakespeare; Shakespeare Wallah
(dir. James Ivory, 1965); the U.S. The Golden Bowl, (dir. James Ivory,
2000), in which a production of an Indian drama which is compared by an
English audience member to Hamlet; New Zealand's Broken English (dir.
Gregor Nicholas, 1996), a spin-off of Romeo and Juliet with a Croatian
Juliet, a Moari Romeo, and a Chinese immigrant couple; a projected As
You Like It directed by Kenneth Branagh and set in Kyoto, Japan; U.S.
Romeo and Juliet spin-offs Romeo Must Die, (dir. Andrzej Bartkowiak,
2000), China Girl, (dir. Abel Ferrara, 1987), and Mississippi Masala;
(dir. Mira Nair, 1991), an Indian Juliet from Uganda and an
African-American Romeo; "Romeo Must Wed," a Disney cartoon episode of
The Proud Family with a romance between an African-American girl as
Juliet and a Chinese boy as Romeo; feature Where the Boys Aren't 10
(dir. F.J. Lincoln,1999), a lesbian adult spin-off of West Side Story
with Asian-American porn star Kobe Tai; The Object of My Affection (dir.
Nicolas Hytner, 1998), a U.S. gay comedy with an Indian Romeo and an
English Juliet in a stage production of the play; an episode of the U.S
television show Kung Fu: The Legend Continues (1992) involving Toronto's
Chinatown and Love's Labor's Lost; the U.S. teen comedy American Pie
(dir. Paul Weitz, 1999) and "chiller" The Glass House, (dir. Daniel
Sackheim, 2001), both of which include Asian-American high school
English teachers of Shakespeare; The Red Violin (dir. Fran

 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.