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Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: June ::
Re: Sonnet 144
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1520  Friday, 14 June 2002

[1]     From:   Michael Shurgot <
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        Date:   Thursday, 13 Jun 2002 08:33:58 -0700
        Subj:   RE: SHK 13.1518 Re: Sonnet 144

[2]     From:   William Sutton <
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        Date:   Thursday, 13 Jun 2002 08:48:42 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1518 Re: Sonnet 144

[3]     From:   W.L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Thursday, 13 Jun 2002 15:44:12 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1518 Re: Sonnet 144


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Shurgot <
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Date:           Thursday, 13 Jun 2002 08:33:58 -0700
Subject: 13.1518 Re: Sonnet 144
Comment:        RE: SHK 13.1518 Re: Sonnet 144

Dear Colleagues:

 Ed Taft writes of the speaker in Shakespeare's sonnets: "In short, a
large part of the problem is [he]." What I find a bit puzzling about
this current exchange is that this insight is considered a revelation.
Consider Claudio in MM: "Our natures do pursue / Like rats that ravin
down their proper bane, / A thirsty evil, and when we drink, we die"
(1.2.131-33 [Signet]).  Claudio's line is universally applicable,
whether one is male or female, gay or straight, or whatever combination
of the above one can muster or imagine.  Consider the sexual muck in
which MM is set; isn't that where we all live?  And recall Harriett
Hawkins' wonderful essay about the audience of MM: we are all of the
devil's party, and easy, formulaic solutions to the "problems" of that
play pale before our own sexual natures.  In short, the largest part of
the problem is we, and certainly characters like Claudio, and the
speaker of the sonnets, hold up a mirror--sorry for that line again, but
it does work, doesn't it?--to our conflicted sexual selves. Love has
always been messy; that is its nature. The speaker of the sonnets is an
especially gifted commentator on that fact, whoever he and his audience
may have been.

Regards,
Michael Shurgot

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Sutton <
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Date:           Thursday, 13 Jun 2002 08:48:42 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 13.1518 Re: Sonnet 144
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1518 Re: Sonnet 144

Hi everyone,

As  I

 

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