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Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: June ::
Re: Bearman, Hoghton, Titchfield
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1550  Monday, 24 June 2002

From:           Takashi Kozuka <
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Date:           Friday, 21 Jun 2002 22:20:22 +0100 (BST)
Subject:        Re: Bearman, Hoghton, Titchfield

I'm sorry that I couldn't respond to this thread sooner. I just came
back from Japan last night. Here are some questions I have.

Sophie Masson claims:

>One of the interesting
>starting-points is that from the age of 16, people
>had to pay fines if
>they were recusants--many Catholic parents sent
>their children away from
>home at this point.

I'm not sure of the connection between them (ie, (a) recusants at and
over the age of 16 had to pay fines and (b) many Catholic parents sent
their children away from home). Is Sophie suggesting that children sent
away from their parents did not have to attend church services or pay
fines? (If so, I would like to see the evidence.)

Sophie also argues:

>Also, though, there are strong
>indications, it seems
>to me, to see William and his family even in
>Warwickshire within a
>strongly-knit circle, in terms of kinship,
>friendship and religion,
>which reached across social hierarchies.

As I have pointed out before, these points are ambiguous; both Catholic
and secular interpretations are possible, and the latter are equally
plausible.  Many biographers and critics who insist on Shakespeare's
Catholic background purposefully neglect alternative interpretations of
the evidences. One must go back to the evidence and consider as many
possible/alternative interpretations of it as possible.

>The connection with Ardens,
>Throckmortons, Blounts, Vaux etc, is indicative that
>even then
>Shakespeare was acquainted, at least, with
>aristocracy or at least high
>gentry.

'The connection with Ardens, Throckmortons, Blounts, Vaux etc.' may
suggest Shakespeare's acquaintance with 'aristocracy or at least high
gentry'. But how does it help to identify the Shakeshafte with
Shakespeare?

With great curiosity,
Takashi Kozuka

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