Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: June ::
Re: Identity of W.S.
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1574  Thursday, 27 June 2002

From:           Edmund Taft <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 26 Jun 2002 12:37:04 -0400
Subject:        Identity of W.S.

Richard Kennedy writes:

"I don't think there was any W.S, but Ford was riding in on
Shakespeare's Sonnets, so to speak.  There is a sameness there,
especially as regards the Fair Youth sonnets.  There might even be some
erotic interest.  I see the use of those initials to be a piece of
marketing, and that there is no mysterious W.S. to be found."

This is a shrewd guess, and it may well be right. After all, throughout
his career, Ford imitated Shakespeare -- in the Renaissance sense of the
word. _T'is Pity She's A Whore" is _Romeo and Juliet_ turned inside out
and upside down; _Perkin Warbeck_ is a redoing of the history plays for
a later, more cynical audience; and Ford's masterpiece, _The Broken
Heart_, can be seen as a tragic retelling of _A Midsummer Night's
Dream_.

Ford is a great playwright, and in that sense I wish he hadn't written
the elegy, but it is also true that the atheistic sentiments of lines
561-68 seem Fordian in both content and tone.

--Ed Taft

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.