2002

Re: Hamlet Texts

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1509  Tuesday, 11 June 2002

From:           Steve Roth <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 10 Jun 2002 08:15:27 -0700
Subject: 13.1478 Re: Hamlet Texts
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1478 Re: Hamlet Texts

>From:           Bernice W. Kliman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

>One of the best solutions I have seen to the editing problem of Hamlet
>is Jesus Tronch's Synoptic Hamlet, an edition that has just recently
>come out, published in Spain

It took a bit of tracking down for price etc. For those who are
interested:

>A synoptic Hamlet: a critical-synoptic edition of the second quarto and first folio texts of Hamlet
>Jesus Tronch-Perez
>Col?leccio Oberta n. 75
>Valencia , Publicacions de la Universitat de Valencia 2002
>406 p., ISBN: 84-370-5381-1, 23 x 17 cm, rustica
>CDU: 820.2
>EAN: 9 788437 053813
>Preu: 23.08 - 24.00

"Preu" is price in Euros:

>El precio del libro es de 24 euros
>Los gastos de envio por barco son de 6,10 euros y por avion 12,15.

(This for shipping to Seattle.) You can order by sending a credit-card
number to:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

or to the addresses that Bernice gave:
FAX      34 (Spain) -63864067
Publicacions Universitat de Valencia
Carrer del Batxiller, 1 - 1
E-46010 VALENCIA

Thanks,
Steve

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: The Royal Shakespeare Company Archives 'FESTE

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1508  Tuesday, 11 June 2002

From:           Susan Brock <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 10 Jun 2002 13:03:25 +0100
Subject: 13.1506 1926 Stratford Coriolanus
Comment:        RE: SHK 13.1506 1926 Stratford Coriolanus

The Royal Shakespeare Company Archives 'FESTE' Database developed by the
Shakespeare Centre Library can be accessed directly at
www.pads.ahds.ac.uk.  Please note that this version is labelled 'draft'
as some data is incorrect and the database has not been recently
updated. We hope that a full and up to date version will be available on
the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust web site by the end of 2002.

Susan Brock
Head of Library and Information Resources
The Shakespeare Centre Library

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

1926 Stratford Coriolanus

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1506  Friday, 7 June 2002

From:           Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 09 Jun 2002 20:29:42 -0700
Subject:        1926 Stratford Coriolanus

For some reason I am not able to access the Touchstone search engine.
Will someone who can, please check to see if it has the date of the
opening of *Coriolanus* in Stratford's converted cinema?  I'm almost
certain it was 23 April, but don't want to rely on my always tricky
memory.

Please send the answer to me off-list, address above.  No need to
trouble Hardy with extra work.

Thanks in advance,
Mike Jensen

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: Sonnet 144

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1507  Tuesday, 11 June 2002

[1]     From:   Karen Peterson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 10 Jun 2002 04:58:10 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1503 Re: Sonnet 144

[2]     From:   Edmund Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 10 Jun 2002 13:26:32 -0400
        Subj:   Sonnet 144

[3]     From:   Ira Zinman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 10 Jun 2002 21:34:11 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1503 Re: Sonnet 144


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Karen Peterson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 10 Jun 2002 04:58:10 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 13.1503 Re: Sonnet 144
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1503 Re: Sonnet 144

Mari Bonami asked (and was echoed by Martin Green and Abigail Quart),

> How can we be sure the order/numbering of the
> sonnets as we receive them
> from editors is an order Shakespeare himself
> created?

Well, the short answer is that we *can't* be sure.  This is one of the
ongoing, vexed issues of sonnet criticism (and editing).  For anyone who
is interested in a quick survey of the two poles of the debate, I'd
recommend Heather Dubrow's essay, "'Uncertainties now crown themselves
assur'd': The Politics of Plotting Shakespeare's Sonnets" (*Shakespeare
Quarterly* 47.3 [Fall 1996], pp. 291-305), for reasons to doubt the
received order.  On the other side, Katherine Duncan-Jones argues for
accepting the received 1609 Q order in her introductory essay to her
Arden 3 edition (1997, pp. 1-105).  I tend to find Duncan-Jones'
arguments persuasive, but there are valid, albeit contradictory, points
made on both sides.

Martin Green's comments on the tropes involving flowers, scents, smells,
etc., reminded me of a recent, and extremely interesting volume I am now
reading: Richard Halpern's *Shakespeare's Perfume: Sodomy and Sublimity
in the Sonnets, Wilde, Freud and Lacan* (Philadelphia: U Pennsylvania P,
2002).  I would encourage anyone interested in the issues raised by this
thread to take a look at it.

Karen E. Peterson

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Edmund Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 10 Jun 2002 13:26:32 -0400
Subject:        Sonnet 144

Mari Bonomi and Abigail Quart are surely right that there's no absolute
proof that the order of the poems as Thorpe printed them is the order
Shakespeare wanted. Moreover, the triangle involving the Dark Lady, the
speaker, and the young man may be described as early as sonnets 40-42,
which means that even if the order is right, Shakespeare skips from one
event to another and violates strict chronology, if only briefly.

But the Dark Lady sonnets form a group that seems to tell a coherent
story, and seems predicated on the reader's prior knowledge of the
relationship between the fair young man and the speaker. That
Shakespeare might hint at this story earlier (40-42, 99) doesn't mean
that these three sonnets were written at the same time as 144 or that 99
and 144 are identical.

Sam Small observes of the fair young man that

" Although the boy is now profligate, he is still seen as an angel, the
'stinking lilies' being a warning rather than a description of his
present state."

OK. Or maybe the moral character of the fair young man is a fact that
the speaker doesn't want to face, especially since the speaker himself
is off his high horse now and feels, at the least, that he is engaged in
an unsavory liaison?

Though Martin Green does not agree, I still feel that the case for
psychomachia is a strong one:

"Two loves I have of comfort and despair. . . ."

What if this line refers to the speaker's desire for the fair young man
and the dark lady, respectively?  If so, the poem is about the
"corruption" of "pure" desire by "impure" desire. The pure desire is for
the young man, but the speaker is being won over by his own hellish
desire for the dark lady.

The question of misogyny is an important one, and I don't mean to
minimize it, but the case can be made that the focus is really on (1)
anatomizing the speaker's desire as it is changing from one object to
another, and (2) on the socially constructed feelings that would
necessarily accompany this change in this time period.

The real question, for me at least, is whether or not the speaker's
feelings and attitudes are being critiqued and found wanting. He does,
after all, end up hopelessly looking for "cure," which suggests that
he's gotten himself into one hell of a mess.

--Ed Taft

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ira Zinman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 10 Jun 2002 21:34:11 EDT
Subject: 13.1503 Re: Sonnet 144
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1503 Re: Sonnet 144

What is so great about Shakespeare in the Sonnets and elsewhere is that
there is room for a variety of interpretations.  If we think of the Bard
as speaking on the literal or plain level, it is appropriate to talk
about his relationship with the youth, poet, dark lady etc.

But when we are looking for the levels of allegory or  the esoteric, the
words have to be looked at differently.  A dark lady is not a woman
"colour'd ill" but become the symbol for something else.. something
dark, and not necessarily feminine at all.  In 144, the nature of
"pride" as that which is the "dark" side of the human nature, or ego was
clearly evident in literature and scripture long before as well as
contemporaneous to Shakespeare.

There is room for the literal and the deeper side.  When looking at the
deeper interpretations, the "order" of the sonnets fit coherently, I
have found.

I appreciate all of the comments I have read.

Ira Zinman

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

A Shakespearean Revel

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1505  Friday, 7 June 2002

From            John F. Andrews <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 8 Jun 2002 15:52:15 -0700
Subject:        A Shakespearean Revel

A SPECIAL OFFER FROM THE SHAKESPEARE GUILD

A Shakespearean Revel
At Lincoln Center

A GALA DURING WHICH KEVIN KLINE
WILL RECEIVE THE 2002 GIELGUD AWARD


A festive salute to America's most influential playwright, and to an
artist who is keeping the classical tradition vibrant. Please join John
Cleese, Barry Edelstein, Bernard Gersten, Adam Gopnik, Margot Harley,
Kitty Carlisle Hart, Bill Irwin, Dana Ivey, Piper Laurie, Tony Randall,
Roger Rees, and other stars for Bardic vignettes, amusing anecdotes,
gratituitous insults, and warm tributes to one of the most versatile and
respected actors of our time.

Monday, June 17, at 8:00 p.m.
Lincoln Center's Alice Tully Hall

Tickets are available through The Shakespeare Guild at prices from $50
to $500; those at $125 or more ($80 of which is tax-deductible) provide
seating near the stage as well as admission to an elegant post-show
reception.

If you order through the Guild in response to this message, you may
deduct 5% of the price for any tickets you purchase.

For an Order Form that may be printed out and then faxed, simply click
on the PDF link at www.shakespeareguild.com. Otherwise, all you need to
do is reply to this message.

John F. Andrews, President
The Shakespeare Guild
2141 Wyoming Avenue NW, Suite 41
Washington, DC 20008-3916

Phone 202 483 8646 or 202 234 4602
Fax 202 483 7824 or 202 234 4639

Orders at full price may be placed through the Lincoln Center box office
(212 721 6500) or through www.lincolncenter.org, both of which have
tickets available for as low as $30.

The Guild also invites you to attend a Speaking of Shakespeare
discussion on Monday night, June 10, with Ben Cameron, executive
director of Theatre Communications Group, at 8:00 p.m in the National
Arts Club (15 Gramercy Park, New York). Admission is free; for details
call the Club at 202 475 3424.

For another Shakespeare Guild event that may be of interest to you, 


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