2003

Group for Early Modern Cultural Studies

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0321  Wednesday, 19 February 2003

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 18 Feb 2003 10:32:18 -0500
Subject:        Group for Early Modern Cultural Studies

Group for Early Modern Cultural Studies (submission deadline 5/1/03;
conference 10/23/03-10/26/03)

HISTORY, AUTHORITY, PERFORMANCE

The 11th Annual Conference for the Group for Early Modern Cultural
Studies (GEMCS)

Hosted by the UC Irvine Drama Department at the Newport Beach Marriott
Hotel and Resort

NEWPORT BEACH, CALIFORNIA, OCTOBER 23-26, 2003

Held at the beautiful Newport Beach Marriott Hotel and Resort
(overlooking the Pacific Ocean and next to "Fashion Island," Orange
County's nexus for shopping, fine dining, and barhopping), this year's
GEMCS conference will be lavish as well as stimulating. With an
extraordinary conference discount for rooms, $99 for singles and
doubles, the wonders of Southern California are rarely more affordable.

The conference topic, broadly conceived, is designed to include all work
(by graduate students, professors, and independent scholars) about human
life between, roughly, 1500 and 1800, and in any way related to history,
authority, and/or performance. In other words, we invite presentations
of scholarship dealing with the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries and about
and/or practicing materialism, historiography, literary-cultural-social
history and criticism, sexual-gender issues, hermeneutics, authorship,
aesthetics, representation, theatre, and/or sociocultural action, power,
discourse, politics, ideology, and so on.

GEMCS's annual conference, averaging 400 participants, provides a lively
forum for innovative, experimental, and alternative inquiries into all
aspects of pre-modern and early modern culture and society. We solicit
abstracts for papers, panels, discussion groups or workshops that engage
either specific or a variety of disciplines, approaches, and formats. We
encourage atypical formats such as workshops and discussion groups. To
promote intense discussion, it has been a tradition of GEMCS that
presentations be limited to 10 minutes. We ask that you try to maintain
this tradition.

Abstracts (maximum 250 words) for individual papers,
workshops/discussions (any number of participants over eight), and paper
sessions (between three and six participants), must be submitted by: MAY
1, 2003.

Please send abstracts and inquiries to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Organized by Bryan Reynolds, Head of Doctoral Studies in the Department
of Drama at UC Irvine, this event is sponsored by the Joint UCI/UCSD
Ph.D.  Program in Drama and Theatre.

Additional support for the conference comes from UC Irvine's departments
of English and Comparative Literature, History, and German Studies.

For updated information about the conference, see the conference
website: http://drama.arts.uci.edu/GEMCS2003

For information about GEMCS's scholarly journal, Journal for Early
Modern Cultural Studies, see: http://english.fsu.edu/gemcs/

CFP: Group for Early Modern Cultural Studies (5/1/03; 10/23/03-10/26/03)

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: Shakespeare's Dogs and Henry VI Questions

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0320  Wednesday, 19 February 2003

[1]     From:   James Doyle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 18 Feb 2003 13:30:10 -0000
        Subj:   Shakespeare's Dogs and Henry VI Questions

[2]     From:   Elliott H. Stone <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 18 Feb 2003 22:47:12 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0292 Re: Shakespeare's Dogs


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James Doyle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 18 Feb 2003 13:30:10 -0000
Subject:        Shakespeare's Dogs and Henry VI Questions

Shakespeare's Dogs

Interesting to see that the one known use of a dog, in the film,
completely ignores the reference to Troilus as a spaniel!  A great Dane
was probably thought more impressive.  They, like Tom Pendleton, are
probably thinking of types like the King Charles or Cavalier, which are
quite small.  My friend's water spaniel, at six months old, is as large
in the body as a Dalmatian or Doberman, albeit shorter in the leg.
She's going to be quiet a sizeable animal when she's fully grown.  I
can't find a decent photo of one with a human on the web, but there are
some good photos here: http://clubs.akc.org/iwsc/, and I note that the
American Kennel Club page on the breed refers to them as being "often
called the clown of the spaniel family, possibly due to the peak of
curly hair between the eyes." Appropriate for both plays, I think!

Incidentally, my own mongrel played Crab in our production of Two
Gentlemen, and - without any training - did a whole lot more than
standing there; he stole the show! Photos including the dog are at:
http://www.hants.gov.uk/villagers/htm/photos01.htm

Henry VI questions:

According to my reference books, the dolphin (Fr. dauphin) was used as
an heraldic device by the Counts of Vienne, leading to one of their
territories becoming known as the Dauphine (with an acute accent on the
e).  In 1349, Count Humbert ceded this territory to the French king, on
condition that the heir to the throne be known as the Dauphin.  The
first Dauphin was either Jean, son of Philippe VI, later king as Jean II
or Jean's son Charles (V) who seems to be the first to use the dolphins
heraldically - see http://www.heraldica.org/topics/france/roygenea.htm.
So the title came with the territory.

Regards,
james doyle

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Elliott H. Stone <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 18 Feb 2003 22:47:12 EST
Subject: 14.0292 Re: Shakespeare's Dogs
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0292 Re: Shakespeare's Dogs

1. I once went to the Broadway show ANNIE. We then went next door to
Gallagher's for a steak. On the menu there was a special, "Sandy Special
Steak Tartar."

2. In Byatt's book POSSESSIONS the ladies have dogs that have the same
name as the dogs in KING LEAR.

Best,
Elliott H. Stone

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Globe Research Seminar CFP

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0318  Wednesday, 19 February 2003

From:           Kevin De Ornellas <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 17 Feb 2003 22:30:31 +0000
Subject:        Globe Research Seminar CFP

THE GLOBE RESEARCH SEMINAR

CALL FOR PAPERS

Globe Education, in coordination with the Shakespeare Institute of the
University of Birmingham, the Drama Department of University of Bristol
and the English Department of King's College London, has started a
research seminar in early modern drama for postgraduate students and
postdoctoral researchers. The aim is to create a forum for up-and-coming
scholars working in English and Drama to talk about their work with
those who are at a similar stage in their careers. The seminar is open
to postgraduate students, of any institution, with research interests in
the subject.

Seminars are held on Sundays at the Globe Theatre (12pm - 2pm). They are
timed to coincide with the "Read Not Dead" season at the Globe, so that
the participants are able to see some of the lesser-known plays of the
period performed. "Read Not Dead" is a project to stage-read all of the
400 or so non-Shakespearean plays written for the commercial theatres
between 1567 and 1642 with professional casts.

Proposals are invited for papers to be given in the forthcoming seminars
(16 March and 6 April 2003) and in future seasons. Papers, which should
be about 25 minutes long, may focus on any aspect of sixteenth- and
early seventeenth-century drama; speakers would normally be undertaking
research for a PhD or have recently completed their PhD. Anyone wishing
to present a paper should send a proposal (max 200 words) to Lucy Munro
(This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) or Martin Wiggins (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: 400th Anniversary of Elizabeth I

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0319  Wednesday, 19 February 2003

[1]     From:   Takashi Kozuka <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 17 Feb 2003 21:34:42 0000
        Subj:   Re: 400th Anniversary of Elizabeth I

[2]     From:   Al Magary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 17 Feb 2003 15:41:47 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0302 400th Anniversary of Elizabeth I

[3]     From:   Nicholson Skip <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 17 Feb 2003 17:15:19 -0800
        Subj:   RE: SHK 14.0302 400th Anniversary of Elizabeth I


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Takashi Kozuka <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 17 Feb 2003 21:34:42 0000
Subject:        Re: 400th Anniversary of Elizabeth I

>Can anyone on the site give information about other
>events which may scheduled to remember the Queen?

The Centre for the Study of the Renaissance, University of Warwick (UK),
is organising a conference on Elizabethan progresses. It'll take place
at King Edward VI School, Stratford-upon-Avon, on 12-13 April (2003).

I hope SHAKSPERians who attended our biography conference have received
the flier(s) about the upcoming conference by now. (If you haven't, you
can find the organiser's contact details below.)

I told the conference organiser that I could post the information online
if she wanted me to, but so far she hasn't forwarded any further details
to me. I believe Patrick Collinson is one of the keynote speakers.

For further information, contact Dr. Jayne Archer (conference organiser)
at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Best wishes,
Takashi

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Al Magary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 17 Feb 2003 15:41:47 -0800
Subject: 14.0302 400th Anniversary of Elizabeth I
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0302 400th Anniversary of Elizabeth I

The Huntington Library opened a new exhibition on Elizabeth I just
before Christmas:  "Gloriana! The Golden Legend of Elizabeth I," in the
West Hall of Library, through June 15, 2003.  Web page:
http://www.huntington.org/ArtDiv/queen.html

Here's the squib from the library:  The life of one of England's
greatest monarchs, Elizabeth I, is explored in this exhibition, drawn
exclusively from materials in The Huntington's collections. The exhibit
commemorates the 400th anniversary of the death of the "Virgin Queen" on
March 24, 1603. One of the central themes explored is how Elizabeth used
the media of the day to create and control her own image. Featured in
the exhibit will be original letters and documents bearing Elizabeth's
distinctive signature along with rare books synonymous with Renaissance
English literature. A stunning selection of early prints will document
the most famous people and events of Elizabethan England: the Queen and
her Court, the establishment of the Anglican Church, the danger of Mary
Queen of Scots, the defeat of the Spanish Armada, Sir Francis Drake's
circumnavigation of the world, and the extraordinary outpouring of
poetry, prose and drama inspired by the queen that helped create the
legend of Elizabeth as "Gloriana."

Among associated events are:

EXHIBIT LECTURE: "Arrayed in Majesty:
Material and Symbolic Aspects of the Clothing of Elizabeth I of England"
February 18 (Tuesday) 7:30 p.m.
The adage "Clothes make the man (or woman)" was even truer in Tudor
times than in our own. As princess, Elizabeth largely had her clothed
identity fashioned for her. After coming to the throne, however, she
deployed the fashions, colors, and ornamentation of her dress to shape
and enact her special "Virgin Queenship." Janel Mueller, Dean of
Humanities at The University of Chicago, will discuss the royal wardrobe
and how it helped create the Elizabethan legend. This lecture is
presented in conjunction with the exhibit "Gloriana! The Golden Legend
of Elizabeth I," on view December 20 through June 15 in the Library.
Free. Information: (626) 405-2100.

CONFERENCE: "Redefining British Theater History: From Script to Stage in
Early Modern England"
February 28-March 1 (Friday-Saturday) 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
This two-day conference will consider the complex and changing relation
of authors to actors, and text to performance, in Shakespeare's theater.
Registration is $25.00 (graduate students free). Optional lunches are
available at an additional cost. For more information, call (626)
405-2194 or e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Friends' Hall.

CHILDREN'S WORKSHOP: "Queen for a Day"
March 8 (Saturday) 9 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
Imagine being a queen (or king) for a day in the time of Elizabeth I.
Was it all pomp and pageantry or a royal pain? Kids will explore the
realm of queens and courtiers in the exhibit "Gloriana! The Golden
Legend of Elizabeth I," and then they'll have some hands-on fun creating
an authentic Elizabethan craft.  Ages 6 and up. $15 (Includes all
materials and one free admission for an accompanying adult.) Space is
limited.  Registration: (626) 405-2128.

Al Magary

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nicholson Skip <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 17 Feb 2003 17:15:19 -0800
Subject: 14.0302 400th Anniversary of Elizabeth I
Comment:        RE: SHK 14.0302 400th Anniversary of Elizabeth I

To mark the 400th anniversary of the death of Queen Elizabeth I, the
Huntington Library in San Marino, California, has as its major exhibit
through 15 June "Gloriana! The Golden Legend of Elizabeth I." The
display includes letters and documents, rare books, early prints --
including the Hilliard miniature paintings of the Queen -- and, as they
say, more.

Cheers,
Skip Nicholson
South Pasadena (CA) HS
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Two Reviews of Cox's Revenger's Tragedy

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0317  Wednesday, 19 February 2003

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 17 Feb 2003 16:19:07 -0500
Subject:        Two Reviews of Cox's Revenger's Tragedy

Revengers Tragedy
Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian
Friday February 14, 2003

Alex Cox, working from Frank Cottrell Boyce's adaptation, has come up
with a very lively and watchable version of Thomas Middleton's original
1607 play - a Jacobean horror comic, gashed and daubed with the kind of
crudity and uncompromising bad taste that, if nothing else, is
thoroughly in keeping with the original. I had been fearing a terrible
mess of Jarman-ism and Greenaway-ism, and to be honest there's a touch
of both, but it's kept under control and there's a fairly tight focus on
telling the story, perhaps partly because the play isn't that well
known.

Like My Kingdom, Don Boyd's updating of Lear, this is set in gangland
Liverpool, though without the sentimental gangsterism of that movie.
Christopher Eccleston is Vindici, the malevolent outsider who returns to
avenge the poisoning of his bride by the lascivious Duke, played with
pale makeup and grotesque rosebud lips by Derek Jacobi. To this end, he
offers his service to the Duke's scheming son Lussurioso, played very
nicely by Eddie Izzard, upstaging everyone with his sly humour and easy,
relaxed command of the language. Izzard has a definite screen presence;
one day the right script and director are going to make him a real movie
star. The film itself is an honourable experiment, refreshingly without
the piety of Shakespeare adaptations.

Philip French
Sunday February 16, 2003
The Observer

In refusing to call the film The Revenger's Tragedy, the director, Alex
Cox, has apparently followed the 1607 text. Would that the rest of his
film had been so fastidious. As Robert Louis Stevenson might have said
had he been captain of the Starship Enterprise, it is better to boldly
go than to arrive, and the effort that has gone into getting Cox's
ambitious picture into production hasn't led to anything coherent or
revealing up there on the screen.

A shaven-headed, darting-eyed Christopher Eccleston has a commanding
presence as Vindici, the malcontent out to revenge the murder of his
fiancee by the lecherous Duke (Derek Jacobi). But much of the acting is
below par and the complex intrigue makes little sense in the realistic
context of a decaying, once grand Liverpool. My Kingdom, Don Boyd's
recent transposition of King Lear to Merseyside, was far more
successful, but Boyd was adapting a very familiar play and had the good
sense to re-work the story and to jettison most of the verse.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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