2003

Re: Endings of Titus Andronicus

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0401  Thursday, 27 February 2003

[1]     From:   Christine Cornell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 26 Feb 2003 16:59:06 -0400
        Subj:   Endings of Titus Andronicus

[2]     From:   Elliott H. Stone <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 26 Feb 2003 16:54:24 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0361 Re: Endings of Titus Andronicus


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Cornell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 26 Feb 2003 16:59:06 -0400
Subject:        Endings of Titus Andronicus

This thread on the editorial problems in Titus has been interesting. In
the course of studying the play over the last couple years and teaching
it in a course on the Roman plays, we have become curious about the
textual problems.

Would it not be the case that if the First Folio's authority for 3.2 is
accepted (as it is by almost all contemporary editors), then it is
somewhat problematic to deny that authority to the final lines which
first appeared in Q2?

Christine Cornell
Patrick Malcolmson

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Elliott H. Stone <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 26 Feb 2003 16:54:24 EST
Subject: 14.0361 Re: Endings of Titus Andronicus
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0361 Re: Endings of Titus Andronicus

This all might bring us to a recent article in THE SHAKESPEARE QUARTERLY
that deals with the famous Peachem illustration. The long time issue is
that the illustration does not represent a single scene in Titus
Andronicus. Thus it has been argued that the scene is not from T.A. but
of some other German play. However, it could very well be simply argued
that the Shakespeare play that Peachem saw was actually an earlier
version of T.A. than what has come down to us. Say Quarto X!

Best,
Elliott H. Stone

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Conference Announcement: Renaissance Communities

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0400  Thursday, 27 February 2003

From:           Ray Siemens <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 26 Feb 2003 11:55:46 -0800
Subject:        Conference Announcement: Renaissance Communities (1-3 May,
2003)

*Renaissance Communities*

 Pacific Northwest Renaissance Society
 2003 Meeting
 1-3 May, 2003
 Malaspina University-College, Nanaimo, BC, Canada
 < http://web.mala.bc.ca/siemensr/PNRS2003/ >

The Pacific Northwest Renaissance Society invites you to its 2003
meeting.  The theme of this year's gathering is community, with
reference both to early modern communities of many types and the
interpretive communities today that study them and their output.
Plenary speakers include Paul Stevens (Queens U) and Mark Vessey (U
British Columbia).

Links

- Tentative Conference Programme:
http://web.mala.bc.ca/siemensr/PNRS2003/TentativeProgram.htm

- Registration: http://web.mala.bc.ca/siemensr/PNRS2003/PNRS-Reg.asp
  Nt: discounted registration and hotel booking is available to March
15.

- Conference Poster
   In PDF format:
http://web.mala.bc.ca/siemensr/PNRS2003/PNRS2003Poster.pdf
   In JPG format:
http://web.mala.bc.ca/siemensr/PNRS2003/PNRS2003Poster.jpg

About the PNRS

About Malaspina U-C

Malaspina University-College is host to the 2003 meeting of the PNRS.
Located in Nanaimo, British Columbia -- on the beautiful east coast of
Canada's Vancouver Island --  Malaspina is easily accessible via direct
air and sea-ferry service from Vancouver, as well as by connections from
Victoria and Seattle.  For travel directions, and other information
about Malaspina, please visit its website, at http://www.mala.ca.

_______________________________________________________________
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespop

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0398  Thursday, 27 February 2003

[1]     From:   Peter D. Holland <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 26 Feb 2003 09:52:21 -0500
        Subj:   Shakespop

[2]     From:   Candace Lines <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 26 Feb 2003 12:28:04 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 14.0374 Shakepoparamabop

[3]     From:   Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Feb 2003 08:39:58 -0500
        Subj:   Much Ado in Boston Public


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter D. Holland <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 26 Feb 2003 09:52:21 -0500
Subject:        Shakespop

I swore I wouldn't add to the accumulating hoard of references to
Shakespeare in popular culture but last night's chance encounter was so
extraordinary I can't obey my own rule.

In *Burden of Dreams*, a superb documentary about the making of Werner
Herzog's film *Fitzcarraldo*, it became apparent that at an early stage
Mick Jagger was cast as Wilfred, an actor who supported Fitzcarraldo,
then played by Jason Robards (whose illness halted filming and resulted
in the role being recast and Jagger's character being cut completely).
In a clip from a take, Jagger as Wilfred is seen speaking the following
lines from *Richard III* to Robards as Fitzcarraldo:

And therefore since I cannot prove a lover
To entertain these fair well-spoken days,
I am determined to prove a villain
And hate the idle pleasures of these days (1.1.28-31).

The moment clearly shows that either Wilfred or Jagger or both are
terrible Shakespeare actors.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Candace Lines <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 26 Feb 2003 12:28:04 -0500
Subject: 14.0374 Shakepoparamabop
Comment:        RE: SHK 14.0374 Shakepoparamabop

Another bit of pop Shakespeare: a running thread in the just-concluded
final season of HBO's program Oz (set in a prison) was a production of
Macbeth acted by the prisoners. Throughout the season we saw glimpses of
rehearsals (which were plagued by several Macbeths in a row getting
murdered).  Eventually, one of the show's main villains was cast as
Macbeth, and the show's "hero," or closest thing to it, as Macduff.
These two characters had been feuding for years, and "Macbeth" actually
had murdered one of "Macduff's" children. It was really rather powerful
to see them face off.  And the approach to the whole play seemed
interesting, from what little was shown of it-the witches were judges,
the characters fought with prison-made knives instead of swords, etc.

Candace Lines
Department of English
Howard University

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Feb 2003 08:39:58 -0500
Subject:        Much Ado in Boston Public

Another reference from a student:

Feb 25, Tuesday 2003. Episode of "Boston Public" had reference to Much
Ado About Nothing. There was a reference to the Kevin Branagh's film
adaptation of the play. So, one more way that you can see the transition
from one medium to another in popular teen culture.

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opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: Shaw on Actors' Accents

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0399  Thursday, 27 February 2003

[1]     From:   Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 26 Feb 2003 13:13:56 -0500
        Subj:   SHK 14.0379 Re: Shaw on Actors' Accents

[2]     From:   Brian Willis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 26 Feb 2003 10:50:28 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0379 Re: Shaw on Actors' Accents

[3]     From:   Russell MacKenzie Fehr <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 26 Feb 2003 22:23:52 -0500
        Subj:   Re:14.0368 Shaw on Actors' Accents


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 26 Feb 2003 13:13:56 -0500
Subject: Re: Shaw on Actors' Accents
Comment:        SHK 14.0379 Re: Shaw on Actors' Accents

'around the turn of C20, when the way you pronounced English might,
indeed, give fairly reliable clues to your social class'

I can assure David Evett that the practice of using accents as
indicators not just of regional provenance but of social class was
central to British culture well into the 1960s. Like most of my
generation, I was urged by insecure, braying school-teachers to despise
the way I spoke my native language. The saddest relics of this sort of
phonetic cleansing were probably the strangulated sounds that emanated
unstoppably from the mouth of the recently deceased Roy Jenkins,
latterly peer of the realm, President of the European Commission,
biographer of Churchill, and Chancellor of Oxford University.  Born into
a working-class family in South Wales, he ended up with an elegantly
lisping drawl and an agweeably cwafted 'Fwench' way with the /r/
phoneme. The satirical magazine 'Private Eye' had the last laugh,
printing a cartoon of his supposed gravestone, bearing the simple legend
'Roy Jenkins, W.I.P.'

T. Hawkes

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brian Willis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 26 Feb 2003 10:50:28 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 14.0379 Re: Shaw on Actors' Accents
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0379 Re: Shaw on Actors' Accents

David Evett in regards to Northern Broadsides:

>But most American auditors, and
>many British ones,
>would at least initially find it strange, maybe even
>inaccessible.  Does
>that make it wrong?

No, it does not make it wrong. Actually, as an American auditor and a
Californian one at that, I saw Northern Broadsides perform King John and
Merry Wives in 2001. I was never distracted or overly conscious of the
different pronunciations. I extremely enjoyed both productions. They
seemed to have fun with both plays and the pronunciation did not come
across as stuffy.  Not that I find other, more traditional
pronunciations stuffy, but I think that the concerted effort to ignore
an expected pronunciation and deliver in natural born accents liberated
the actors. Sometimes the effort to perform in an accent takes too much
of the actor's time in preparation. They must prepare two texts - the
words and then their pronunciation of them. It distances the two.
Northern Broadsides seemed to make the text their own rather than make
their performances "Shakespeare's intent". That makes performances
vital, immediate, and submerging - comedy or drama. That is what
performance should aim for.

One other thing: although Shaw has done some brilliant work, I also
think he is wrong about a great many things, not the least of which are
some of his views on Shakespeare and the performance of his work.  I
don't think that any company should be told that they can perform a work
only in one way or style or with a specific pronunciation. If a Japanese
company performed Shakespeare in English with their own particular
Japanese accents, are we to force them to speak RP? That would be silly.

Brian Willis

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Russell MacKenzie Fehr <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 26 Feb 2003 22:23:52 -0500
Subject:        Re:14.0368 Shaw on Actors' Accents

Based on what I've read, it appears that Shaw was a fan of Johnston
Forbes-Robertson, commenting on him as speaking in the way that people
should speak (read his Introduction to Pygmalion).

Does anyone know what he felt about Sir Beerholm Tree, who (in the
surviving recordings, at any rate) has a noticeable (Yorkshire? Welsh?)
accent?

_______________________________________________________________
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Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: Historian Christopher Hill Dies at 91

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0397  Thursday, 27 February 2003

From:           Martin Steward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 26 Feb 2003 14:40:35 -0000
Subject: Historian Christopher Hill Dies at 91
Comment:        SHK 14.0388 Historian Christopher Hill Dies at 91

He was elusive, subtle, devious; he could not be pinned down by any easy
formula - Puritan, humanist, radical - or at least no one has yet found
the formula. Like Oliver Cromwell, he manifestly held some strong
convictions very pertinaciously; but around them there was a shifting
penumbra of - what? A desire to combine intense ideals with practical
realism? A sensitivity to environment? A divided personality? He was
infinitely various. And yet he sang unchanged though fallen on evil
days, on evil days though fallen on evil tongues.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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