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Home :: Archive :: 2003 :: January ::
Re: Shakespeare and Marlowe
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.049  Thursday, 9 January 2003

[Editor's Note: This thread has reached its useful end. Please continue
any further discussion privately. Hardy]

[1]     From:   Sophie Masson <
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        Date:   Thursday, 9 Jan 2003 08:25:48 +1100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.043 Re: Shakespeare and Marlowe

[2]     From:   Russell MacKenzie Fehr <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 08 Jan 2003 22:31:53 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.043 Shakespeare and Marlowe


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sophie Masson <
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Date:           Thursday, 9 Jan 2003 08:25:48 +1100
Subject: 14.043 Re: Shakespeare and Marlowe
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.043 Re: Shakespeare and Marlowe

I'd just like to add one thing to Ed Taft's comments: in my experience,
practically every writer is different in 'real' life to what he or she
is like on the page. People are often surprised when they meet authors
in the flesh--I've had not only the experience of people being surprised
about me(because most people seem to think my writing is 'elegant and
full of clarity', they expect a persona to match--well, I'm a rather
chaotic, impatient person with gypsy looks!)but also myself being
surprised about the writers I've met, whose work I loved and admired,
and who turned out quite differently in real life: for instance, the
romantic on the page who turns out to be a cynic in real life; the
idealist with an obsession with money; the fantasist who is utterly
pragmatic, the social realist who is dreamy and fantastical, the clown
who is very sad, and vice versa. What emerges from the work is often a
composite, made up to a large extent of the author's shadow self, with
observations of others as well, projected onto a bigger stage than his
or her life. What amazed me about Mike's film is that he appeared to
have no idea about this, for it is an enduring truth about writers: in
fact, if I could correct Ed just a little here, it is the antithesis of
the Romantic image, where a writer and his/her life are identical.

Sophie Masson

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Russell MacKenzie Fehr <
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Date:           Wednesday, 08 Jan 2003 22:31:53 -0500
Subject: 14.043 Shakespeare and Marlowe
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.043 Shakespeare and Marlowe

Mr. McNett's review, upon reading it, appears to be him stating back to
us everything the documentary claimed. That isn't critical journalism in
the least part. If he has those documents, show them! (In addition, most
of the references to Marlowe call him something along the lines of
"Marley", include the one signature of his known to exist.) McNett's
belief is about as meaningful as that of any other Tom, Dick, and Harry
that thinks someone else did it.

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